Acid base physiology, neurobiology and behaviour in relation to CO2-induced ocean acidification

TitleAcid base physiology, neurobiology and behaviour in relation to CO2-induced ocean acidification
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsTresguerres M, Hamilton T.J
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume220
Pagination2136-2148
Date Published2017/06
Type of ArticleReview
ISBN Number0022-0949
Accession NumberWOS:000403337600007
Keywordsalkaline; Cerebrospinal fluid; cerebrospinal-fluid; Choroid plexus; climate change; coral-reef fish; elevated carbon-dioxide; GABA; gaba(a) receptors; Gabazine; gamma-aminobutyric-acid; hippocampal interneurons; marine teleost; near-future co2; ocean acidification; tide; zebrafish danio-rerio
Abstract

Experimental exposure to ocean and freshwater acidification affects the behaviour of multiple aquatic organisms in laboratory tests. One proposed cause involves an imbalance in plasma chloride and bicarbonate ion concentrations as a result of acid-base regulation, causing the reversal of ionic fluxes through GABA(A) receptors, which leads to altered neuronal function. This model is exclusively based on differential effects of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine on control animals and those exposed to elevated CO2. However, direct measurements of actual chloride and bicarbonate concentrations in neurons and their extracellular fluids and of GABA(A) receptor properties in aquatic organisms are largely lacking. Similarly, very little is known about potential compensatory mechanisms, and about alternative mechanisms that might lead to ocean acidification-induced behavioural changes. This article reviews the current knowledge on acid-base physiology, neurobiology, pharmacology and behaviour in relation to marine CO2-induced acidification, and identifies important topics for future research that will help us to understand the potential effects of predicted levels of aquatic acidification on organisms.

DOI10.1242/jeb.144113
Short TitleJ. Exp. Biol.
Student Publication: 
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