Amphioxus tails: source and fate of larval fin rays and the metamorphic transition from an ectodermal to a predominantly mesodermal tail

TitleAmphioxus tails: source and fate of larval fin rays and the metamorphic transition from an ectodermal to a predominantly mesodermal tail
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsMansfield J.H, Holland N.D
JournalActa Zoologica
Volume96
Pagination117-125
Date Published2015/01
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0001-7272
Accession NumberWOS:000346775600012
KeywordsAmphioxus; ascidian larvae; biology; branchiostoma-lanceolatum; cephalochordata = acrania; ciliary rootlet; ciliary rootlets; ciliogenesis; embryology; fin rays; floridae; lancelet; nutritional; reserves; tail; tunicata
Abstract

It was previously discovered that tail fin rays of larval amphioxus are long ciliary rootlets in posterior epidermal cells. This work describes the heretofore unknown origin and fate of these organelles in the Florida amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae), In late embryos, epidermal cells at the posterior end of the body increase in height, thus producing a tail fin. One ciliary rootlet in each cell elongates and also rotates through about 90 degrees, soon becoming oriented parallel to the long axis of the cell and running continuously from the apical to the basal plasma membrane. During the subsequent growth of the larval tail, the rootlets and epidermal cells housing them reach lengths up to 120 mu m. At metamorphosis, the rootlets become vacuolated and rapidly decrease in length along with the height of the tail epidermis. Contemporaneously, abundant extracellular dermal matrix accumulates in the sagittal plane of the body to produce a predominantly dermal tail fin. Throughout postmetamorphic life, the posterior epidermal cells, now without ciliary rootlets, thinly cover a largely dermal tail flange. Thus, the specialized morphology of the arnphioxus tail fin is generated by two different cellular mechanisms, involving different cell populations (ectoden-nal and mesodermal), at different life-history stages

DOI10.1111/azo.12058
Short TitleActa Zool.
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Student Publication: 
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