Central and Eastern US surface pressure variations derived from the USArray Network

TitleCentral and Eastern US surface pressure variations derived from the USArray Network
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsJacques A.A, Horel J.D, Crosman E.T, Vernon FL
JournalMonthly Weather Review
Volume143
Pagination1472-1493
Date Published2015/04
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0027-0644
Accession NumberWOS:000352106400027
KeywordsClimatology; continental united-states; cyclones; Data assimilation; disturbances; evolution; mesoscale gravity-waves; north-america; storm-fest; system
Abstract

Large-magnitude pressure signatures associated with a wide range of atmospheric phenomena (e.g., mesoscale gravity waves, convective complexes, tropical disturbances, and synoptic storm systems) are examined using a unique set of surface pressure sensors deployed as part of the National Science Foundation Earth-Scope USArray Transportable Array. As part of the USArray project, approximately 400 seismic stations were deployed in a pseudogrid fashion across a portion of the United States for 1-2 yr, then retrieved and redeployed farther east. Surface pressure observations at a sampling frequency of 1 Hz were examined during the period 1 January 2010-28 February 2014 when the seismic array was transitioning from the central to eastern continental United States. Surface pressure time series at over 900 locations were bandpass filtered to examine pressure perturbations on three temporal scales: meso-(10 min-4 h), subsynoptic (4-30 h), and synoptic (30 h-5 days) scales. Case studies of strong pressure perturbations are analyzed using web tools developed to visualize and track tens of thousands of such events with respect to archived radar imagery and surface wind observations. Seasonal assessments of the bandpass-filtered variance and frequency of large-magnitude events are conducted to identify prominent areas of activity. Large-magnitude mesoscale pressure perturbations occurred most frequently during spring in the southern Great Plains and shifted northward during summer. Synoptic-scale pressure perturbations are strongest during winter in the northern states with maxima located near the East Coast associated with frequent synoptic development along the coastal storm track.

DOI10.1175/mwr-d-14-00274.1
Short TitleMon. Weather Rev.
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