Characterization and Localization of Insoluble Organic Matrices Associated with Diatom Cell Walls: Insight into Their Roles during Cell Wall Formation

TitleCharacterization and Localization of Insoluble Organic Matrices Associated with Diatom Cell Walls: Insight into Their Roles during Cell Wall Formation
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsTesson B, Hildebrand M
JournalPlos One
Volume8
Date Published2013/04
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1932-6203
Accession NumberWOS:000318008400078
Keywordsachnanthes-longipes; atomic-force; bacillariophyceae; fine; phaeodactylum-tricornutum; polysaccharides; scanning-electron-microscopy; silica; structure; thalassiosira-pseudonana; valve morphogenesis
Abstract

Organic components associated with diatom cell wall silica are important for the formation, integrity, and function of the cell wall. Polysaccharides are associated with the silica, however their localization, structure, and function remain poorly understood. We used imaging and biochemical approaches to describe in detail characteristics of insoluble organic components associated with the cell wall in 5 different diatom species. Results show that an insoluble organic matrix enriched in mannose, likely the diatotepum, is localized on the proximal surface of the silica cell wall. We did not identify any organic matrix embedded within the silica. We also identified a distinct material consisting of glucose polymer with variable localization depending on the species. In some species this component was directly involved in the morphogenesis of silica structure while in others it appeared to be only a structural component of the cell wall. A novel glucose-rich structure located between daughter cells during division was also identified. This work for the first time correlates the structure, composition, and localization of insoluble organic matrices associated with diatom cell walls. Additionally we identified a novel glucose polymer and characterized its role during silica structure formation.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0061675
Integrated Research Themes: 
sharknado