Description and clustering of echolocation signals of Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) in Bahia San Julian, Argentina

TitleDescription and clustering of echolocation signals of Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) in Bahia San Julian, Argentina
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsReyes M.VR, Iniguez M.A, Hevia M., Hildebrand JA, Melcon M.L
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume138
Pagination2046-2053
Date Published2015/10
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0001-4966
Accession NumberWOS:000368186600021
Keywordsbats; behavior; grampus-griseus; high-frequency clicks; kerguelen islands; narrow-band; pseudorca-crassidens; rissos; tursiops-truncatus; visual survey
Abstract

Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) inhabit coastal waters of Southern South America and Kerguelen Islands. Limited information exists about the acoustic repertoire of this species in the wild. Here, echolocation signals from free-ranging Commerson's dolphins were recorded in Bahia San Julian, Argentina. Signal parameters were calculated and a cluster analysis was made on 3180 regular clicks. Three clusters were obtained based on peak frequency (129, 137, and 173 kHz) and 3 dB bandwidth (8, 6, and 5 kHz). The 428 buzz clicks were analyzed separately. They consisted of clicks emitted with a median interclick interval of 3.5 ms, peak frequency at 131 kHz, 3 dB bandwidth of 9 kHz, 10 dB bandwidth of 18 kHz, and duration of 56 mu s. Buzz clicks were significantly shorter and with a lower peak frequency and a broader bandwidth than most of the regular clicks. This study provided the first description of different echolocation signals, including on- and off-axis signals, recorded from Commerson's dolphins in the wild, most likely as a result of animals at several distances and orientations to the recording device. This information could be useful while doing passive acoustic monitoring. (C) 2015 Acoustical Society of America.

DOI10.1121/1.4929899
Student Publication: 
No