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Determining the daytime Earth radiative flux from National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) measurements

TitleDetermining the daytime Earth radiative flux from National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) measurements
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsSu W.Y, Minnis P, Liang L.S, Duda D.P, Khlopenkov K.V, Thieman M.M, Yu Y.N, Smith A., Lorentz S.R, Feldman D., Valero F.PJ
Volume13
Pagination429-443
Date Published2020/02
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1867-1381
Accession NumberWOS:000513000000001
Keywordsangular-distribution models; atmosphere; ceres; Clouds; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences; performance; phase; radiant energy system; radiation; satellite; terra; top
Abstract

The National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) onboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) provides continuous full-disk global broadband irradiance measurements over most of the sunlit side of the Earth. The three active cavity radiometers measure the total radiant energy from the sunlit side of the Earth in shortwave (SW; 0.2-4 mu m), total (0.4-100 mu m), and near-infrared (NIR; 0.7-4 mu m) channels. The Level 1 NISTAR dataset provides the filtered radiances (the ratio between irradiance and solid angle). To determine the daytime top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, the NISTAR-measured shortwave radiances must be unfiltered first. An unfiltering algorithm was developed for the NISTAR SW and NIR channels using a spectral radiance database calculated for typical Earth scenes. The resulting unfiltered NISTAR radiances are then converted to full-disk daytime SW and LW flux by accounting for the anisotropic characteristics of the Earth-reflected and emitted radiances. The anisotropy factors are determined using scene identifications determined from multiple low-Earth orbit and geostationary satellites as well as the angular distribution models (ADMs) developed using data collected by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). Global annual daytime mean SW fluxes from NISTAR are about 6% greater than those from CERES, and both show strong diurnal variations with daily maximum-minimum differences as great as 20 Wm(-2) depending on the conditions of the sunlit portion of the Earth. They are also highly correlated, having correlation coefficients of 0.89, indicating that they both capture the diurnal variation. Global annual daytime mean LW fluxes from NISTAR are 3% greater than those from CERES, but the correlation between them is only about 0.38.

DOI10.5194/amt-13-429-2020
Student Publication: 
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