Does delta O-18 of O-2 record meridional shifts in tropical rainfall?

TitleDoes delta O-18 of O-2 record meridional shifts in tropical rainfall?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsSeltzer A.M, Buizert C, Baggenstos D, Brook E.J, Ahn J., Yang J.W, Severinghaus JP
JournalClimate of the Past
Volume13
Pagination1323-1338
Date Published2017/10
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1814-9324
Accession NumberWOS:000412736400001
Keywordsabrupt climate-change; core wd2014 chronology; east-asian monsoon; ice-core; intertropical convergence; last glacial period; millennial-scale; north-atlantic; siple dome; west antarctica; zone
Abstract

Marine sediments, speleothems, paleo-lake elevations, and ice core methane and delta O-18 of O-2 (delta O-18(atm)) records provide ample evidence for repeated abrupt meridional shifts in tropical rainfall belts throughout the last glacial cycle. To improve understanding of the impact of abrupt events on the global terrestrial biosphere, we present composite records of delta O-18(atm) and inferred changes in fractionation by the global terrestrial biosphere (Delta epsilon(LAND)) from discrete gas measurements in the WAIS Divide (WD) and Siple Dome (SD) Antarctic ice cores. On the common WD timescale, it is evident that maxima in Delta epsilon(LAND) are synchronous with or shortly follow small-amplitude WD CH4 peaks that occur within Heinrich stadials 1, 2, 4, and 5 - periods of low atmospheric CH4 concentrations. These local CH4 maxima have been suggested as markers of abrupt climate responses to Heinrich events. Based on our analysis of the modern seasonal cycle of gross primary productivity (GPP)-weighted delta(OatmO)-O-18 of terrestrial precipitation (the source water for atmospheric O-2 production), we propose a simple mechanism by which Delta epsilon(LAND) tracks the centroid latitude of terrestrial oxygen production. As intense rainfall and oxygen production migrate northward, Delta epsilon(LAND) should decrease due to the underlying meridional gradient in rainfall delta O-18. A southward shift should increase Delta epsilon(LAND). Monsoon intensity also influences delta O-18 of precipitation, and although we cannot determine the relative contributions of the two mechanisms, both act in the same direction. Therefore, we suggest that abrupt increases in Delta epsilon(LAND) unambiguously imply a southward shift of tropical rainfall. The exact magnitude of this shift, however, remains under-constrained by Delta epsilon(LAND).

DOI10.5194/cp-13-1323-2017
Short TitleClim. Past.
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