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Environmental pH, O-2 and capsular effects on the geochemical composition of statoliths of embryonic squid Doryteuthis opalescens

TitleEnvironmental pH, O-2 and capsular effects on the geochemical composition of statoliths of embryonic squid Doryteuthis opalescens
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsNavarro M.O, Bockmon E.E, Frieder C.A, Gonzalez J.P, Levin L.A
JournalWater
Volume6
Pagination2233-2254
Date Published2014/08
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number2073-4441
Accession NumberWOS:000341100400005
Keywordsacidification; california bight; carbonate ion concentration; cephalopod sepia-officinalis; climate change; current; deoxygenation; elemental signatures; geochemistry; geographic-variation; humboldt squid; intensified upwelling; loligo-opalescens; market squid; ocean acidification; southern; statolith; system; uranium
Abstract

Spawning market squid lay embryo capsules on the seafloor of the continental shelf of the California Current System (CCS), where ocean acidification, deoxygenation and intensified upwelling lower the pH and [O-2]. Squid statolith geochemistry has been shown to reflect the squid's environment (e. g., seawater temperature and elemental concentration). We used real-world environmental levels of pH and [O-2] observed on squid-embryo beds to test in the laboratory whether or not squid statolith geochemistry reflects environmental pH and [O-2]. We asked whether pH and [O-2] levels might affect the incorporation of element ratios (B:Ca, Mg:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca, U:Ca) into squid embryonic statoliths as (1) individual elements and/or (2) multivariate elemental signatures, and consider future applications as proxies for pH and [O-2] exposure. Embryo exposure to high and low pH and [O-2] alone and together during development over four weeks only moderately affected elemental concentrations of the statoliths, and uranium was an important element driving these differences. Uranium: Ca was eight-times higher in statoliths exposed to low pHT (7.57-7.58) and low [O-2] (79-82 mu mol.kg(-1)) than those exposed to higher ambient pHT (7.92-7.94) and [O-2] (241-243 mu mol.kg(-1)). In a separate experiment, exposure to low pHT (7.55-7.56) or low [O-2] (83-86 mu mol.kg(-1)) yielded elevated U:Ca and Sr:Ca in the low [O-2] treatment only. We found capsular effects on multiple elements in statoliths of all treatments. The multivariate elemental signatures of embryonic statoliths were distinct among capsules, but did not reflect environmental factors (pH and/or [O-2]). We show that statoliths of squid embryos developing inside capsules have the potential to reflect environmental pH and [O-2], but that these "signals" are generated in concert with the physiological effects of the capsules and embryos themselves.

DOI10.3390/w6082233
Short TitleWater-Sui
Student Publication: 
No