Episodic Southern Ocean heat loss and its mixed layer impacts revealed by the farthest south multiyear surface flux mooring

TitleEpisodic Southern Ocean heat loss and its mixed layer impacts revealed by the farthest south multiyear surface flux mooring
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsOgle S.E, Tamsitt V., Josey S.A, Gille ST, Cerovecki I, Talley LD, Weller RA
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume45
Pagination5002-5010
Date Published2018/05
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0094-8276
Accession NumberWOS:000435262000052
Keywordsair-sea heat flux; antarctic mode water; anthropogenic carbon; co2; Geology; interannual variability; intermediate water; mixed layer; mooring; sea interaction research; Southern Ocean; Subantarctic Mode Water; transport; variability
Abstract

The Ocean Observatories Initiative air-sea flux mooring deployed at 54.08 degrees S, 89.67 degrees W, in the southeast Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, is the farthest south long-term open ocean flux mooring ever deployed. Mooring observations (February 2015 to August 2017) provide the first in situ quantification of annual net air-sea heat exchange from one of the prime Subantarctic Mode Water formation regions. Episodic turbulent heat loss events (reaching a daily mean net flux of -294W/m(2)) generally occur when northeastward winds bring relatively cold, dry air to the mooring location, leading to large air-sea temperature and humidity differences. Wintertime heat loss events promote deep mixed layer formation that lead to Subantarctic Mode Water formation. However, these processes have strong interannual variability; a higher frequency of 2 sigma and 3 sigma turbulent heat loss events in winter 2015 led to deep mixed layers (>300m), which were nonexistent in winter 2016.

DOI10.1029/2017gl076909
Student Publication: 
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