Evolution of the North Pacific subtropical mode water in anticyclonic eddies

TitleEvolution of the North Pacific subtropical mode water in anticyclonic eddies
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsXu LX, Xie SP, Liu QY, Liu C., Li P.L, Lin X.P
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research-Oceans
Volume122
Pagination10118-10130
Date Published2017/12
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number2169-9275
Accession NumberWOS:000422732100047
Keywordsgyre; kuroshio extension system; Mesoscale eddies; oceanography; subduction; transport; variability
Abstract

Anticyclonic eddies (AEs) trap and transport the North Pacific subtropical mode water (STMW), but the evolution of the STMW trapped in AEs has not been fully studied due to the lack of eddy-tracking subsurface observations. Here we analyze profiles from special-designed Argo floats that follow two STMW-trapping AEs for more than a year. The enhanced daily sampling by these Argo floats swirling around the eddies enables an unprecedented investigation into the structure and evolution of the trapped STMW. In the AEs, the upper (lower) thermocline domes up ( concaves downward), and this lens-shaped double thermocline encompasses the thick STMW within the eddy core. The lighter STMW (25.0 similar to 25.2 sigma(theta)) trapped in AEs dissipates quickly after the formation in winter because of the deepening seasonal thermocline, but the denser STMW (25.2 similar to 25.4 sigma(theta)) remains largely unchanged except when the AE passes across the Izu Ridge. The enhanced diapycnal mixing over the ridge weakens the denser STMW appreciably. While many AEs decay upon hitting the ridge, some pass through a bathymetric gap between the Hachijojima and Bonin Islands, forming a cross- ridge pathway for STMW transport. By contrast, the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) underneath is deeper than the eddy trapping depth (600 m), and hence left behind east of the Izu Ridge. In Argo climatology, the shallow STMW (< 400 m) intrudes through the gap westward because of the eddy transport, while the NPIW (800 m) is blocked by the Izu Ridge.

DOI10.1002/2017jc013450
Short TitleJ Geophys Res-Oceans
Student Publication: 
No