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Factors affecting the inland and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation over the Tug Hill Plateau

TitleFactors affecting the inland and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation over the Tug Hill Plateau
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsVeals P.G, Steenburgh W.J, Campbell L.S
JournalMonthly Weather Review
Volume146
Pagination1745-1762
Date Published2018/06
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0027-0644
Accession NumberWOS:000437094500006
Keywordsair-flow; convective structures; effect snow event; effect snowstorms; froude-number; great-salt-lake; heat-flux; land breeze; mesoscale; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences; numerical-simulation
Abstract

The factors affecting the inland and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation are poorly understood, yet critical for operational forecasting. Here we use nine cool seasons (16 November-15 April) of radar data from the Montague/Ft. Drum, New York (KTYX), WSR-88D, the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), and observations from the Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLeS) field campaign to examine variations in lake-effect precipitation enhancement east of Lake Ontario and over the Tug Hill Plateau (hereafter Tug Hill). Key factors affecting the inland and orographic enhancement in this region include the strength of the incident boundary layer flow, the intensity of the lake-induced convective available potential energy (LCAPE), and the mode of the lake-effect system. Stronger flow favors higher precipitation rates, a precipitation maximum displaced farther downwind, and greater inland and orographic enhancement. The effects of LCAPE depend upon the strength of the flow. During periods of weak flow, higher LCAPE favors lower precipitation rates, a maximum closer to the shoreline, and lesser inland and orographic enhancement. During periods of strong flow, higher LCAPE favors higher precipitation rates, a maximum displaced farther downwind, and greater inland and orographic enhancement. Banded (nonbanded) modes favor higher (lower) precipitation rates, lesser (greater) inland and orographic enhancement, and a maximum closer to the shoreline (over Tug Hill). These results, for both manually measured and radar-estimated precipitation, are robust when many lake-effect events are considered, but substantial variability exists during individual events.

DOI10.1175/mwr-d-17-0385.1
Short TitleMon. Weather Rev.
Student Publication: 
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