GPM satellite radar measurements of precipitation and freezing level in atmospheric rivers: comparison with ground-based radars and reanalyses

TitleGPM satellite radar measurements of precipitation and freezing level in atmospheric rivers: comparison with ground-based radars and reanalyses
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsCannon F., Ralph FM, Wilson A.M, Lettenmaier DP
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres
Volume122
Pagination12747-12764
Date Published2017/12
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number2169-897X
Accession NumberWOS:000419396500003
Keywordsalgorithm; atmospheric rivers; climate; coast; convection; forecasts; freezing level; frequency; GPM; height; orographic precipitation; reanalyses; satellite precipitation radar; sierra-nevada; western united-states; winter
Abstract

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) account for more than 90% of the total meridional water vapor flux in midlatitudes, and 25-50% of the annual precipitation in the coastal western United States. In this study, reflectivity profiles from the Global Precipitation Measurement Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM-DPR) are used to evaluate precipitation and temperature characteristics of ARs over the western coast of North America and the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Evaluation of GPM-DPR bright-band height using a network of ground-based vertically pointing radars along the West Coast demonstrated exceptional agreement, and comparison with freezing level height from reanalyses over the eastern North Pacific Ocean also consistently agreed, indicating that GPM-DPR can be used to independently validate freezing level in models. However, precipitation comparison with gridded observations across the western United States indicated deficiencies in GPM-DPR's ability to reproduce the spatial distribution of winter precipitation, likely related to sampling frequency. Over the geographically homogeneous oceanic portion of the domain, sampling frequency was not problematic, and significant differences in the frequency and intensity of precipitation between GPM-DPR and reanalyses highlighted biases in both satellite-observed and modeled AR precipitation. Reanalyses precipitation rates below the minimum sensitivity of GPM-DPR accounted for a 20% increase in total precipitation, and 25% of radar-derived precipitation rates were greater than the 99th percentile precipitation rate in reanalyses. Due to differences in the proportions of precipitation in convective, stratiform bright-band, and non-bright-band conditions, AR conditions contributed nearly 10% more to total precipitation in GPM-DPR than reanalyses.

DOI10.1002/2017jd027355
Student Publication: 
No