Guide to the trematodes (Platyhelminthes) that infect the California horn snail (Cerithideopsis californica: Potamididae: Gastropoda) as first intermediate host

TitleGuide to the trematodes (Platyhelminthes) that infect the California horn snail (Cerithideopsis californica: Potamididae: Gastropoda) as first intermediate host
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsHechinger R.F
Volume4711
Pagination459-494
Date Published2019/12
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1175-5326
Accession NumberWOS:000503721900003
KeywordsBaja California; biodiversity; Cerithidea californica; digenea; diversity; estuary; heterophyidae; indicators; interspecific interactions; larval trematodes; life-cycle; marine snail; parasites; parasitic castration; parasitic castrators; social-organization; Soldier caste; species richness; Trematoda; zoology
Abstract

The California horn snail, Cerithideopsis californica, lives in estuarine habitats from California (USA) in North America to Piura (Peru) in South America. Throughout this range, the snail serves as first intermediate host for a diverse guild of digenean trematodes. These parasites are used in teaching laboratories, and have been subject to a large amount of taxonomic, biological, evolutionary, and ecological research. Despite the abundance of research on these trematodes, we lack a satisfactory guide to these parasites. This manuscript treats the 19 trematode species that we are currently able to distinguish morphologically. I provide taxonomic affinities, information on second intermediate host use, an identification key focused on cercaria traits, information and a key for regressed infections lacking cercariae, information on early infections, and species accounts. The species accounts present photographs, additional diagnostic information, taxonomic notes, information concerning cryptic species, and connections to relevant literature. The primary aim of this manuscript is to facilitate research on this trematode guild by serving as an identification tool, and by providing background information, including highlighting gaps in our knowledge.

DOI10.11646/zootaxa.4711.3.3
Student Publication: 
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