Larger submicron particles for emissions with residential burning in wintertime San Joaquin Valley (Fresno) than for vehicle combustion in summertime South Coast Air Basin (Fontana)

TitleLarger submicron particles for emissions with residential burning in wintertime San Joaquin Valley (Fresno) than for vehicle combustion in summertime South Coast Air Basin (Fontana)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsBetha R., Russell LM, Chen C.L, Liu J., Price D.J, Sanchez K.J, Chen S.J, Lee A.KY, Collier S.C, Zhang Q., Zhang X.L, Cappa CD
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres
Volume123
Pagination10526-10545
Date Published2018/09
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number2169-897X
Accession NumberWOS:000447807300029
Keywordsaerosol growth; aerosol mass-spectrometer; aerosol size distribution; chemical-composition; distributions; european megacity paris; high-resolution; major highway; mechanisms; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences; organic aerosol; particulate matter; refractory black carbon; San Joaquin Valley; size; size-resolved organic aerosol sources; source apportionment; Southern California Air Basin; ultrafine particles
Abstract

Size-resolved composition of atmospheric aerosol particles during winter (19 December 2014 to 13 January 2015) in the San Joaquin Valley at Fresno and during summer (4 to 28 July 2015) in the Southern California Air Basin at Fontana were measured by aerosol mass spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, single particle soot photometer, and scanning electrical mobility sizer. The Fresno study had low-fog and high-fog winter conditions, and residential burning was a frequent contributor to evening emissions. Fireworks during Fourth of July celebrations characterized the start of the Fontana study; the remaining days were categorized as nonfirework days and were mostly affected by traffic emissions. Fresno had particle distributions with number mode diameters of 70-150 nm, and Fontana had 30-50-nm diameters. The nonrefractory organic mass mode diameters were also larger at Fresno (250-380 nm in dry mobility diameter) than at Fontana (130-150 nm, 280 nm in dry mobility diameter) as were refractory black carbon particles (Fresno: 80-180 nm; Fontana: 80-100 nm in dry volume equivalent diameter). The size dependence of organic contributions to particle mass indicated that condensation or other surface-limited processes contributed oxidized organic fractions to aerosol mass in Fontana but that volume-limited aqueous reactions produced organic mass on both low-fog and high-fog days in Fresno. Linear regression analysis of organic aerosol sources with size-resolved particle volume at different times of day also showed that residential burning-related particles increased from 70-160 nm in the evening (18:00 to 23:59) to 150-260 nm at night (00:00 to 05:59) on low-fog days.

DOI10.1029/2017jd026730
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