Metal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology

TitleMetal composition of fine particulate air pollution and acute changes in cardiorespiratory physiology
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsS C, R D, LM K, M M, K VRyswyk, J V, L L, P K, E T, R V, S W
Date Published2014/06
Type of ArticleJournal article
Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studying the physiologic effects of components of fine particulate mass (PM2.5) could contribute to a better understanding of the nature of toxicity of air pollution.
OBJECTIVES:

We examined the relation between acute changes in cardiovascular and respiratory function, and PM2.5-associated-metals.
METHODS:

Using generalized linear mixed models, daily changes in ambient PM2.5-associated metals were compared to daily changes in physiologic measures in 59 healthy subjects who spent 5-days near a steel plant and 5-days on a college campus.
RESULTS:

Interquartile increases in calcium, cadmium, lead, strontium, tin, vanadium and zinc were associated with statistically significant increases in heart rate of 1-3 beats per minute, increases of 1-3 mmHg in blood pressure and/or lung function decreases of up to 4% for total lung capacity.
CONCLUSION:

Metals contained in PM2.5 were found to be associated with acute changes in cardiovascular and respiratory physiology.

DOI10.1016/j.envpol.2014.03.004
Student Publication: 
No
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