A model for partitioning the light absorption coefficient of natural waters into phytoplankton, nonalgal particulate, and colored dissolved organic components: A case study for the Chesapeake Bay

TitleA model for partitioning the light absorption coefficient of natural waters into phytoplankton, nonalgal particulate, and colored dissolved organic components: A case study for the Chesapeake Bay
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsZheng G.M, Stramski D, DiGiacomo P.M
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research-Oceans
Volume120
Pagination2601-2621
Date Published2015/04
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number2169-9275
Accession NumberWOS:000354417200013
Keywordsaquatic; CDOM absorption; chlorophyll; coastal waters; coefficient; infrared spectral region; inherent optical-properties; light absorption coefficient; marine waters; matter; nonalgal particulate absorption; Ocean optics; particles; partitioning absorption; phytoplankton absorption; retrievals; sargasso sea; seawater
Abstract

We present a model, referred to as Generalized Stacked-Constraints Model (GSCM), for partitioning the total light absorption coefficient of natural water (with pure-water contribution subtracted), a(nw)(), into phytoplankton, a(ph)(), nonalgal particulate, a(d)(), and CDOM, a(g)(), components. The formulation of the model is based on the so-called stacked-constraints approach, which utilizes a number of inequality constraints that must be satisfied simultaneously by the model outputs of component absorption coefficients. A major advancement is that GSCM provides a capability to separate the a(d)() and a(g)() coefficients from each other using only weakly restrictive assumptions about the component absorption coefficients. In contrast to the common assumption of exponential spectral shape of a(d)() and a(g)() in previous models, in our model these two coefficients are parameterized in terms of several distinct spectral shapes. These shapes are determined from field data collected in the Chesapeake Bay with an ultimate goal to adequately account for the actual variability in spectral shapes of a(d)() and a(g)() in the study area. Another advancement of this model lies in its capability to account for potentially nonnegligible magnitude of a(d)() in the near-infrared spectral region. Evaluation of model performance demonstrates good agreement with measurements in the Chesapeake Bay. For example, the median ratio of the model-derived to measured a(d)(), a(g)(), and a(ph)() at 443 nm is 0.913, 1.064, and 1.056, respectively. Whereas our model in its present form can be a powerful tool for regional studies in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall approach is readily adaptable to other regions or bio-optical water types.

DOI10.1002/2014jc010604
Short TitleJ Geophys Res-Oceans
Student Publication: 
No
Research Topics: 
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