Potential of select intermediate-volatility organic compounds and consumer products for secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation under relevant urban conditions

TitlePotential of select intermediate-volatility organic compounds and consumer products for secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation under relevant urban conditions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsLi W.H, Li L.J, Chen C.L, Kacarab M., Peng W.H, Price D., Xu J., Cocker D.R
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume178
Pagination109-117
Date Published2018/04
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1352-2310
Accession NumberWOS:000428104200012
KeywordsAtmospheric availability; atmospheric chemistry; chamber; Consumer products; downwind concentrations; emissions; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Intermediate-volatility organic compounds; IVOC; mass-spectrometer; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences; n-alkanes; oh radicals; oxidation; ozone; secondary organic aerosol; soa formation; vapor wall loss
Abstract

Emissions of certain low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) are considered exempt to volatile organic compounds (VOC) regulations due to their low evaporation rates. However, these compounds may still play a role in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone formation, The LVP-VOCs selected for this work are categorized as intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) according to their vapor pressures and molecular formulas. In this study, the evaporation rates of 14 select IVOCs are investigated with half of them losing more than 95% of their mass in less than one month. Further, SOA and ozone formation are presented from 11 select IVOCs and 5 IVOC-containing generic consumer products under atmospherically relevant conditions using varying radical sources (NOx and/or H2O2) and a surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixture. Benzyl alcohol (0.41), n-heptadecane (0.38), and diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (0.16) are determined to have SOA yields greater than 0.1 in the presence of NO,, and a surrogate urban hydrocarbon mixture. IVOCs also influence ozone formation from the surrogate urban mixture by impacting radical levels and N-x. availability. The addition of lab created generic consumer products has a weak influence on ozone formation from the surrogate mixture but strongly affects SOA formation. The overall SOA and ozone formation of the generic consumer products could not be explained solely by the results of the pure IVOC experiments.

DOI10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.12.019
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