Utilization of heme as an iron source by marine alphaproteobacteria in the roseobacter clade

TitleUtilization of heme as an iron source by marine alphaproteobacteria in the roseobacter clade
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsRoe K.L, Hogle S.L, Barbeau K.A
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume79
Pagination5753-5762
Date Published2013/09
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0099-2240
Accession NumberWOS:000323421900038
Keywordscampestris pv. campestris; ferrous wheel; microbial community; natural organic-ligands; northwest atlantic; ocean; phytoplankton; prokaryotic genomes; protein; vibrio-cholerae
Abstract

The bioavailability and utilization of porphyrin-bound iron, specifically heme, by marine microorganisms have rarely been examined. This study used Ruegeria sp. strain TrichCH4B as a model organism to study heme acquisition by a member of the Roseobacter clade. Analogs of known heme transporter proteins were found within the Ruegeria sp. TrichCH4B genome. The identified heme uptake and utilization system appears to be functional, as the heme genes were upregulated under iron stress, the bacterium could grow on ferric-porphyrin complexes as the sole iron source, and internalization of(55) Fe from ferric protoporphyrin IX was observed. The potential ability to utilize heme in the Roseobacter clade appears to be common, as half of the isolates in the RoseoBase database were found to have a complete heme uptake system. A degenerate primer set was designed and successfully used to identify the putative heme oxygenase gene (hmus) in the roseobacter heme uptake system from diverse nonenriched marine environments. This study found that members of the Roseobacter clade are capable of utilizing heme as an iron source and that this capability may be present in all types of marine environments. The results of this study add a new perspective to the current picture of iron cycling in marine systems, whereby relatively refractory intracellular pools of heme-bound iron may be taken up quickly and directly reincorporated into living bacteria without previous degradation or the necessity of a siderophore intermediate.

DOI10.1128/aem.01562-13
Integrated Research Themes: 
Student Publication: 
No