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Vertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol-cloud interactions

TitleVertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol-cloud interactions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsCalmer R., Roberts GC, Preissler J., Sanchez K.J, Derrien S., O'Dowd C.
JournalAtmospheric Measurement Techniques
Volume11
Pagination2583-2599
Date Published2018/05
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1867-1381
Accession NumberWOS:000431414900004
Keywordsafternoon; airborne; atmospheric boundary-layer; bllast campaign; closure; doppler radar; fluxes; kinetic-energy; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences; system; turbulence measurements
Abstract

The importance of vertical wind velocities (in particular positive vertical wind velocities or updrafts) in atmospheric science has motivated the need to deploy multi-hole probes developed for manned aircraft in small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). In atmospheric research, lightweight RPAs ( < 2.5 kg) are now able to accurately measure atmospheric wind vectors, even in a cloud, which provides essential observing tools for understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. The European project BACCHUS (impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding) focuses on these specific interactions. In particular, vertical wind velocity at cloud base is a key parameter for studying aerosol-cloud interactions. To measure the three components of wind, a RPA is equipped with a five-hole probe, pressure sensors, and an inertial navigation system (INS). The five-hole probe is calibrated on a multi-axis platform, and the probe-INS system is validated in a wind tunnel. Once mounted on a RPA, power spectral density (PSD) functions and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) derived from the five-hole probe are compared with sonic anemometers on a meteorological mast. During a BACCHUS field campaign at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (Ireland), a fleet of RPAs was deployed to profile the atmosphere and complement ground-based and satellite observations of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, clouds, and meteorological state parameters. The five-hole probe was flown on straight-and-level legs to measure vertical wind velocities within clouds. The vertical velocity measurements from the RPA are validated with vertical velocities derived from a ground-based cloud radar by showing that both measurements yield model-simulated cloud droplet number concentrations within 10 %. The updraft velocity distributions illustrate distinct relationships between vertical cloud fields in different meteorological conditions.

DOI10.5194/amt-11-2583-2018
Short TitleAtmos. Meas. Tech.
Student Publication: 
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