Warming and weakening of the abyssal flow through Samoan Passage

TitleWarming and weakening of the abyssal flow through Samoan Passage
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsVoet G., Alford MH, Girton J.B, Carter G.S, Mickett J.B, Klymak J.M
JournalJournal of Physical Oceanography
Volume46
Pagination2389-2401
Date Published2016/08
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0022-3670
Accession NumberWOS:000380799200008
Keywordsheat; pacific-ocean; transport; water
Abstract

The abyssal flow of water through the Samoan Passage accounts for the majority of the bottom water renewal in the North Pacific, thereby making it an important element of the meridional overturning circulation. Here the authors report recent measurements of the flow of dense waters of Antarctic and North Atlantic origin through the Samoan Passage. A 15-month long moored time series of velocity and temperature of the abyssal flow was recorded between 2012 and 2013. This allows for an update of the only prior volume transport time series from the Samoan Passage from WOCE moored measurements between 1992 and 1994. While highly variable on multiple time scales, the overall pattern of the abyssal flow through the Samoan Passage was remarkably steady. The time-mean northward volume transport of about 5.4 Sv (1 Sv = 10(6) m(3) s(-1)) in 2012/13 was reduced compared to 6.0 Sv measured between 1992 and 1994. This volume transport reduction is significant within 68% confidence limits (60.4 Sv) but not at 95% confidence limits (+/-0.6 Sv). In agreement with recent studies of the abyssal Pacific, the bottom flow through the Samoan Passage warmed significantly on average by 1 x 10(-38)Cyr(-1) over the past two decades, as observed both in moored and shipboard hydrographic observations. While the warming reflects the recently observed increasing role of the deep oceans for heat uptake, decreasing flow through Samoan Passage may indicate a future weakening of this trend for the abyssal North Pacific.

DOI10.1175/jpo-d-16-0063.1
Student Publication: 
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