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Kelp: The Next Superfood?

Every summer, students in the Marine Biodiversity and Conservation MAS Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego spend a week on Catalina Island, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California. Here, the students learn to identify local algae and fish species as well as how to measure their populations using belt transects.

However, this year’s most innovative experiment was rooted more in gastronomy than ecology or marine biology. After finding an excellent specimen of elk kelp (Pelagophycus porra) during an afternoon transect, the class decided to make kelp pickles.

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Ancient Whale Named After Scripps Scientists

Richard and Ken Norris honored with Norrisanima miocaena

An extinct species of whale was recently renamed in remembrance of the late Ken Norris and his son Richard (Dick) Norris, both influential scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Norrisanima miocaena is newly described in the journal PierJ .

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Reducing methane emissions with seaweed

Sustainability in the Deep Water

In memory of  Roger Revelle, the Ocean Studies Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine created the Roger Revelle Commemorative Lecture series featuring distinguished speakers on the themes of ocean science and public policy.

The 20th annual Revelle Commemorative Lecture “Sustainability in Deep Water: The challenges of climate change, human pressures, and biodiversity conservation.”  was delivered by Dr. Lisa A. Levin, CMBC Director Emeritus. The recorded lecture is now available on the Revelle lecture website.

 

 

Deep-sea expert Lisa Levin to receive Grand Medal for science

Congratulations to CMBC Director Emeritus, Dr. Lisa Levin who will receive the highest international distinction to ocean sciences presented by the Oceanographic Institute, Prince Albert I of Monaco Foundation.

The Oceanographic Institute of Monaco said it chose Levin as the 2019 science lauréat for her considerable work that “seeks to highlight the need for the political, technological, and economic sectors to work alongside scientists with the aim of paying more attention to the impacts of human activity on marine environments.”

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CMBC Alumnus Receives First Walter Munk Scholar Award

Congratulations to Dr. Alfredo Giron, graduate under Dr. Octavio Aburto, received the newly created award that honors Walter Munk’s legacy.

From Left: Rick Spinrad (MTS President), Alfredo Giron, Mary Munk, Andy Clark (MTS Vice President of Research, Industry and Technology

The inaugural award was presented to Alfredo Giron at the OCEANS Conference in Marseille. Giron received his Ph.D. in March from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. After receiving the award, Giron presented his commemorative lecture, “The Risk of Oversimplification in Fisheries Management.” This lecture was the first in what will become the annual Commemorative Walter Munk Scholar Lecture Series, presented by the award recipient at the annual conference.

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New Method of Communication in Crabs

Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated

Scientists have known that crabs use a leg-rubbing technique to communicate, as well as specialized ridges on the claws and arms that are rubbed together to produce noise. But when Jennifer Taylor, an assistant professor at CMBC and lead author of a  new study, heard the sounds of stridulation from her ghost crabs, neither their legs nor claws were moving.

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Taking the Heat

Lisa Levin, CMBC Director Emeritus – shows consequences of a warming ocean in major international report.

Lisa Levin describes deep-sea organisms to students during a recent field course. Photo: Cody Gallo

Levin, represented Scripps in co-authoriing the fifth chapter, “Changing Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, and Dependent Communities,” of the IPCC’s Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC). The chapter authors write that the ocean is exhibiting physical and biochemical changes due to carbon emissions from human activity. These emissions have led to the ocean’s warming, acidification, and oxygen loss.

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Findings help predict the fate of coral reefs

Scientists find that corals rely more on hunting than previously thought

When it comes to feeding, corals have two options. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren’t creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat prey swimming nearby. Paper lead author Mike Fox – a postdoctoral scholar at WHOI who completed this research as a PhD student at Scripps – found that some corals rely more on hunting than scientists previously suspected.
The study published Tuesday, September 17, in the journal Functional Ecology.

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CMBC Alumni attend the Annual Ocean Gala during Capitol Hill Ocean Week

CMBC Alumni attend Ocean Gala Award Ceremony

Dr. Nancy Knowlton, CMBC founding director, was awarded the National Marine Sanctuaries Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award for her contributions to coral research, science communication and marine science education.

Young professionals whose careers have been shaped by Dr. Knowlton’s efforts span the globe as leaders and influencers, shaping US ocean policy in the halls of Congress and conducting research that combines the natural and social sciences to inform decision making. Pictured here with Drs Jeremy Jackson and Nancy Knowlton are some CMBC alumni who attended the gala. Matt Mulrennan  Dr. Miriam Goldstein, Kim McIntyre, Dr. Ayana Johnson, and Shannon Yee.

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Our Daily Planet – Heroines of the Week:  Two Long Time Ocean Champions

California Sea Grant selects three CMBC alumni

NOAA Sea Grant has announced the finalists for the incoming class of the John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellows. Four finalists nominated by California Sea Grant will begin placements in Washington D.C. in February 2020.  Three of these finalists are CMBC Alumni.

Congratulations to Jennifer Lee, Kaitlyn Lowder, and Kat Montgomery

 

 

This fall, the they will travel to Washington, D.C., to interview with several executive or legislative offices. Following placement, they will begin their fellowship in February 2020

Executive appointments for the 2019 Knauss fellows included placements throughout the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as well as with Department of the Interior, National Science Foundation, U.S. Navy, and other agencies. Legislative placements included the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (Minority), the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure (Majority), the Senate Commerce Committee (Majority and Minority), the House Committee on Natural Resources (Minority), and several placements in both majority and minority of offices.

Jennifer, Kaitlyn and Kat will join another 28 alumni who now work in Washington, D.C. Twenty Four of these alumni were Knauss Fellows.

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