Category Archives: Blog

Postponed

Salty Cinema:  Blue Carbon – Postponed to date uncertain
Robert Paine Scripps Forum, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Salty Cinema is a community supported forum.  If these events are of value to you, and you have the ability, please contribute to our costs. https://giveto.ucsd.edu/giving/home/gift-referral/11f0bb24-950a-4386-ab11-3515e282eae6


Knowlton/Jackson Distinguished Lecturer –  POSTPONED
Robert Paine Scripps Forum, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Speaker:  Dr. Patricia Majluf, a native of Peru, an expert on fisheries and anchoveta (a fish in the anchovy family), and the vice president of Oceana Peru. The Peruvian anchoveta, the target of the largest single species fishery on earth, a cornerstone of the Peruvian economy, and a focus of Dr. Majluf’s work for decades. Up to 98 percent of Peru’s six to ten million ton annual catches of anchoveta are ‘reduced’ to create fish oil and fishmeal products. Dr. Majluf has worked tirelessly to change this by encouraging people to eat anchoveta directly, as doing so would make available millions of pounds of a heart-healthy and protein rich food source. By engaging with the fishing and processing industries, activist chefs, and the international sustainable seafood movement, Majluf has raised the profile of the anchoveta worldwide and is having a direct impact on improving the sustainability of the world’s largest fishery.

Alumni Speaker:  Mike Navarro, Ph.D. as been selected to represent CMBC Alumni. Mike is an Assistant Professor in Marine Fisheries at the University of Alaska Southeast where he works to inform the seafood industry, seafood dependent communities, and marine resource policy makers regarding the impacts of oceanographic changes. the Navarro Lab focuses on local seafood security research opportunities aimed to keep fisheries sustainable for families and ecosystems. Lab members works to keep policy makers knowledgeable so that their constituents can choose the type of balance they want between commerce and environmental trade offs.

How Many Parasites Can a Shore Bird Carry?

Featured research from the Hechinger Lab: The conclusion represents a new line of thinking in parasitology.

Birds like this black-crowned Night Heron were studied to understand their parasite load. Photo: Andrew Turner/Ryan Hechinger

A team of ecologists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has made a breakthrough that has implications for multiple fields within biology as well as epidemiology.

Ecologist Ryan Hechinger and colleagues tested a new way to predict the parasite load carried by California shorebirds they collected and analyzed. The principles they describe, however, could apply to any organism that hosts parasites, including humans. Hechinger describes parasites as the “dark matter” of ecosystems: they are ubiquitous and a key component of energy flow through those systems, but their ecological function is often overlooked.

The study appears today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. In it, Hechinger’s team – including Kate Sheehan, a former postdoctoral researcher in Hechinger’s lab now at Frostburg State University in Maryland, and Hechinger Lab Manager Andrew Turner – describes how the amount of space inside or on a host, whether it be an ostrich or hummingbird, elephant or mouse, has less to do with the total parasite load it can carry at any given time and is more related to how much energy it can supply to those parasites.

https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/how-many-parasites-can-bird-carry

Kelp: The Next Superfood?

Every summer, students in the Marine Biodiversity and Conservation MAS Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego spend a week on Catalina Island, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California. Here, the students learn to identify local algae and fish species as well as how to measure their populations using belt transects.

However, this year’s most innovative experiment was rooted more in gastronomy than ecology or marine biology. After finding an excellent specimen of elk kelp (Pelagophycus porra) during an afternoon transect, the class decided to make kelp pickles.

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Ancient Whale Named After Scripps Scientists

Richard and Ken Norris honored with Norrisanima miocaena

An extinct species of whale was recently renamed in remembrance of the late Ken Norris and his son Richard (Dick) Norris, both influential scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Norrisanima miocaena is newly described in the journal PierJ .

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Reducing methane emissions with seaweed

Sustainability in the Deep Water

In memory of  Roger Revelle, the Ocean Studies Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine created the Roger Revelle Commemorative Lecture series featuring distinguished speakers on the themes of ocean science and public policy.

The 20th annual Revelle Commemorative Lecture “Sustainability in Deep Water: The challenges of climate change, human pressures, and biodiversity conservation.”  was delivered by Dr. Lisa A. Levin, CMBC Director Emeritus. The recorded lecture is now available on the Revelle lecture website.

 

 

Deep-sea expert Lisa Levin to receive Grand Medal for science

Congratulations to CMBC Director Emeritus, Dr. Lisa Levin who will receive the highest international distinction to ocean sciences presented by the Oceanographic Institute, Prince Albert I of Monaco Foundation.

The Oceanographic Institute of Monaco said it chose Levin as the 2019 science lauréat for her considerable work that “seeks to highlight the need for the political, technological, and economic sectors to work alongside scientists with the aim of paying more attention to the impacts of human activity on marine environments.”

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CMBC Alumnus Receives First Walter Munk Scholar Award

Congratulations to Dr. Alfredo Giron, graduate under Dr. Octavio Aburto, received the newly created award that honors Walter Munk’s legacy.

From Left: Rick Spinrad (MTS President), Alfredo Giron, Mary Munk, Andy Clark (MTS Vice President of Research, Industry and Technology

The inaugural award was presented to Alfredo Giron at the OCEANS Conference in Marseille. Giron received his Ph.D. in March from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. After receiving the award, Giron presented his commemorative lecture, “The Risk of Oversimplification in Fisheries Management.” This lecture was the first in what will become the annual Commemorative Walter Munk Scholar Lecture Series, presented by the award recipient at the annual conference.

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New Method of Communication in Crabs

Ghost crabs use structure in their stomach to communicate when agitated

Scientists have known that crabs use a leg-rubbing technique to communicate, as well as specialized ridges on the claws and arms that are rubbed together to produce noise. But when Jennifer Taylor, an assistant professor at CMBC and lead author of a  new study, heard the sounds of stridulation from her ghost crabs, neither their legs nor claws were moving.

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Taking the Heat

Lisa Levin, CMBC Director Emeritus – shows consequences of a warming ocean in major international report.

Lisa Levin describes deep-sea organisms to students during a recent field course. Photo: Cody Gallo

Levin, represented Scripps in co-authoriing the fifth chapter, “Changing Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, and Dependent Communities,” of the IPCC’s Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC). The chapter authors write that the ocean is exhibiting physical and biochemical changes due to carbon emissions from human activity. These emissions have led to the ocean’s warming, acidification, and oxygen loss.

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Findings help predict the fate of coral reefs

Scientists find that corals rely more on hunting than previously thought

When it comes to feeding, corals have two options. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren’t creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat prey swimming nearby. Paper lead author Mike Fox – a postdoctoral scholar at WHOI who completed this research as a PhD student at Scripps – found that some corals rely more on hunting than scientists previously suspected.
The study published Tuesday, September 17, in the journal Functional Ecology.

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