Numerical Modeling

Scientists use numerical models (for example, TDFD, time-domain finite-differences) on a computer to predict how ice shelves vibrate in response to ice quakes, ocean wave impacts, and other sources. A vertical cross section is taken through the floating ice including the water, sediments and rock (basalt) (Figure 1c). In fluids and gases vibrations are called “sound”; in solids vibrations travel as compressional and shear waves. At 10Hz, vibrations in the ice are coupled to sound in the water and to vibrations in the seafloor (Figure 1a & b).

TDFD model results for an ice quake in a 300m thick, floating, ice shelf over a 100m thick sub-shelf cavity.  Details of this figure can be found in Bromirski and Stephen (2012).
TDFD model results for an ice quake in a 300m thick, floating, ice shelf over a 100m thick sub-shelf cavity. Details of this figure can be found in Bromirski and Stephen
(2012).