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  1. Voyager: Why can’t scientists predict earthquakes?

    Submitted by middle school participants in the Geo educational program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green IGPP at Scripps houses geologists who study earthquakes. Nov 01, 2007 Scientists have learned much about the properties of ro ...

    Last Updated: May 23, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  2. Voyager: If San Diego is at the edge of a tectonic plate, will we always keep moving/slipping?

    Submitted by students participating in the Geo program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps Many small faults in the greater San Andreas Fault system run through the San Diego area. Nov 01, 2007 In our lifetime, and for many generations to come, San Diego and Sou ...

    Last Updated: May 23, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  3. Voyager: To whom will Argo research be given? How will it be published and used?

    Submitted by the sixth grade summer science class, Rancho Santa Fe School Data from Argo floats will help scientists learn more about the world oceans, including global ocean warming and sea level rise. Sep 01, 2007 A: Data from the Argo project are being ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  4. Voyager: How are Argo buoys able to descend and ascend? Is there a motor?

    Submitted by the sixth grade summer science class, Rancho Santa Fe School Nearly 3,000 Argo floats have been dropped throughout the world’s oceans. Sep 01, 2007 A: Yes, a motor is needed to make Argo floats travel up and down in the ocean, but not in the ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  5. Voyager: Is there anything we can do in San Diego to conserve coral reefs?

    Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif. Aug 01, 2007 A: Yes! Although we in San Diego live far from coral reefs, we can still help improve their condition. The first step is educating ourselves about cora ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  6. Voyager: How do scientists "sample" or study a "pristine" habitat such as the Line Islands without contributing to the human impact that we are concerned with in the first place?

    Submitted by 11th grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif. Aug 01, 2007 A: Scientists study coral reefs using a variety of methods, and given the state of coral reefs today, we try to make sure we don’t damage them in the proce ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  7. Voyager: "What would happen to the coral reef ecosystem if the corals were destroyed? What would happen to the overall health of the ocean?"

    Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego,Calif. Scientists are interested in how corals affect the health of their home ecosystems. Jun 01, 2007 A: Corals are called ecosystem engineers because they build the thre ...

    Last Updated: May 2, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  8. Voyager: "Why is diversity so important to the world we live in?"

    Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif. Healthy captive coral species like these at Birch Aquarium are faring better than other coral species in the wild Jun 01, 2007 A: This question has been at the fore ...

    Last Updated: May 2, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  9. Voyager: How exactly do aerosols scatter in the air, and if their time is relatively short, then why do they have a major impact in the atmosphere and temperature of the earth?

    Submitted by Mrs. Gastil’s science students, San Ysidro High School Satellite photo of dust. Photo: NASA Earth Observatory. May 04, 2007 A: Aerosols consist of tiny particles or droplets suspended in the air. Particles are produced by a variety of natural ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  10. Voyager: Is the chemical composition of natural and human-made aerosols the same, and which one has a greater effect on the earth's atmosphere?

    Submitted by Mrs. Gastil’s science students, San Ysidro High School. May 01, 2007 A: Aerosols are small particles, either solid or liquid, in the atmosphere. They can come from both natural sources and human activities. Examples of natural aerosols includ ...

    Last Updated: May 20, 2016 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography