Voyager for Kids

Science questions from kids of all ages are answered by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, scientists. Ask one yourself here for a chance to win a Scripps t-shirt!

Parabolic disc solar cookers are said to boil water faster than conventional stoves in direct sunlight. Voyager: Since soot has detrimental effects on humans and their surroundings, why aren't solar stoves used worldwide?
Wynnie T, 17, Irvine, Calif.
Jan 01, 2010
In many areas, Indian women rely on dung or wood to fuel cooking stoves. Image courtesy of M.V. Ramana Voyager: To what extent does biomass burning add to the increase in climate change?
Submitted by high school students
Jan 01, 2010
These potbellied seahorses will be featured at the new seahorses exhibit at Birch Aquarium at Scripps. Voyager: How does the tail of a seahorse work and what is it for?
Submitted by K through 4th grade students at Berean Bible Baptist Academy, Chula Vista, Calif.
Nov 01, 2009
Lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus). Photo credit: Phillip Colla Voyager: How did seahorses get their name? Why are they called seahorses?
Submitted by K through 4th grade students at Berean Bible Baptist Academy, Chula Vista, Calif.
Nov 01, 2009
Depiction of subduction zone. Voyager: Does the location of a volcano change the temperature of the gas or its composition?
Submitted by campers in the “Marine Biologist for a Week” Grades 4-6 Summer Learning Adventure Camp at Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Sep 01, 2009
Tufts of dark cyanobacteria, called Lyngbya, were collected during a research trip in 2007 to Panama's Bocas del Toro. Voyager: How do scientists find medicines in the wilderness?
Submitted by fifth grade students, Montgomery Elementary School, Chula Vista, Calif.
Jul 01, 2009
This organism was found to produce compounds that counteract malaria. Voyager: How do you know if a compound kills cancer cells? How is it tested?
Submitted by fifth grade students, Montgomery Elementary School, Chula Vista, Calif.
Jul 01, 2009
Seen from a satellite, a thick plume of smog makes its way across the Yellow Sea towards Korea. Voyager: Does smoke (from cigarettes and fires) have an effect on clouds and aerosols?
Submitted by 6th grade students, Monroe Clark Middle School, San Diego, Calif.
Jun 01, 2009
A smoggy Los Angeles skyline Voyager: How are aerosols formed? How do aerosols move from place to place? Do aerosols become concentrated in certain areas?
Submitted by 6th grade students, Monroe Clark Middle School, San Diego, Calif.
May 01, 2009
Using ROV Jason, Scripps researchers pick up rocks from the Gulf of California seafloor for later geochemical analysis. Voyager: As the Gulf of California expands, does the seafloor sink?
Submitted by 9th–12th grade students, Upward Bound Program, Santa Ana College, Santa Ana, Calif.
May 01, 2009
Researchers control ROV Jason on the bottom of the Gulf of California from the control room onboard R/V Atlantis. Voyager: What have scientists discovered about the Gulf of California? How long does it take to analyze geological samples?
Submitted by 9th-10th grade students, Julian High School, Julian, Calif.
May 01, 2009
Fish in the Marine Vertebrate Collection at Scripps Institution of Oceanography Voyager: How many fish species are in the Scripps DNA database so far?
Submitted by 9th through 12th grade students, Cibola High School, Yuma, Ariz.
Apr 01, 2009
Preparing fish specimen tissue for DNA sequencing as part of the Scripps barcoding project. Voyager: How do scientists collect tissue and DNA samples? Does a fish have to be alive or can it be dead or preserved?
Submitted by 9th through 12th grade students, Cibola High School, Yuma, Ariz.
Apr 01, 2009
The health of coral reefs is starting to deteriorate as ocean acidity increases. Voyager: How does ocean acidification directly change coral reef formations?
Submitted by students from the Charter School of San Diego
Mar 01, 2009
It will become more difficult for abalone and other shellfish to produce protective shells as ocean acidity increases. Voyager: Will the increase in acid affect things like boats, nets, or fishing gear; not just the ecosystem?
Submitted by students from the Charter School of San Diego
Mar 01, 2009
Signal flags spelling “Spiess Hall” fly from the railing of the building newly named for Fred Spiess. (Jan. 23, 2009) Spiess Hall of Fame
Newly named Scripps building honors late, legendary oceanographer Fred Spiess
Feb 01, 2009
Scripps’ Piñon Flat Observatory provides researchers with a natural laboratory to study earthquakes. A Step Ahead of the Next “Big One”
From detection to warning, Scripps researchers are helping preparations for Earth’s most elusive natural hazard
Feb 01, 2009
A waveform image from a magnitude 5.4 Mexicali earthquake that occurred on Feb. 8, 2008. Voyager: How do you know you are measuring an earthquake and not something else?
Submitted by 6th graders from Wilson Middle School participating in the GEO program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Feb 01, 2009
Several faults run through San Diego as part of the larger San Andreas Fault system. Voyager: Is a large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault imminent?
--Submitted by 6th graders from Wilson Middle School, participating in the GEO program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Feb 01, 2009
Petri dishes used in algal biofuel research. Voyager: What kind of processes do algae need to go through before they can be used for biofuel? Can you use them raw?
Submitted by 5th graders at Hearst Elementary School in San Diego, Calif.
Dec 01, 2008
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