Voyager for Kids

Science questions from kids of all ages are answered by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, scientists. Ask one yourself here for a chance to win a Scripps t-shirt!

Mark Hildebrand Voyager: Where did you get the idea to use algae as biofuel?
Submitted by 5th graders at Hearst Elementary School, San Diego, Calif.
Dec 01, 2008
Lynne Talley Voyager: How will an increase in seawater temperature affect ocean currents?
Submitted by 9th through 12th grade students participating in the 2009 National Ocean Sciences Bowl
Nov 01, 2008
Protecting cliffs with seawalls could impact the future of beaches, since eroding cliffs provide sand for beaches. Voyager: With sea level rising, will cliffs along the coastline fall into the water?
Submitted by 9th through 12th grade students participating in the 2009 National Ocean Sciences Bowl
Nov 01, 2008
Scripps scientists take collections of huge gels from the Adriatic Sea. Voyager: Where does slime like the kind found in the Adriatic Sea come from?
Submitted by 4th through 6th grade students participating in Birch Aquarium at Scripps’s Summer Learning Adventures program.
Sep 01, 2008
The thick mucilage cover represents a danger for sea-bottom communities. Voyager: How does the unusual slime found in the Adriatic Sea affect animals?
Submitted by 4th through 6th grade students participating in Birch Aquarium at Scripps's Summer Learning Adventures program.
Sep 01, 2008
Scripps scientists take collections of huge gels from the Adriatic Sea. Voyager: Where does slime like the kind found in the Adriatic Sea come from?
Submitted by 4th through 6th grade students participating in Birch Aquarium at Scripps’s Summer Learning Adventures program.
Sep 01, 2008
The thick mucilage cover represents a danger for sea-bottom communities. Voyager: How does the unusual slime found in the Adriatic Sea affect animals?
Submitted by 4th through 6th grade students participating in Birch Aquarium at Scripps's Summer Learning Adventures program.
Sep 01, 2008
The Brackish Groundwater National Desalination Research Facility tests the desalination of brackish and impaired groundwater. Voyager: Does the excessively salty water created by desalination change the pH of the ocean? What is its salinity value?
Submitted by 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students at Mission Bay High School, San Diego, Calif.
Jul 01, 2008
The process of gathering water for desalination could impact microscopic plankton that are caught in intake water. Voyager: How do you keep intake pipes at a desalination plant from being clogged with plankton and seaweed?
Submitted by 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students at Mission Bay High School, San Diego, Calif.
Jul 01, 2008
Earth’s magnetic field protects us from charged particles from the sun. Credit: NASA Voyager: What predictions are scientists making about changes to Earth's environment if the magnetic poles reverse?
Submitted by 9th grade students, Patrick Henry High School, San Diego, Calif.
Jun 01, 2008
The Snow Bunting lives in the Arctic and uses Earth’s magnetic field to migrate further south to northern temperate areas. Voyager: What will happen to animals, like migratory birds, that depend on the current magnetic field?
Submitted by 9th grade students, Patrick Henry High School, San Diego, Calif.
Jun 01, 2008
Scripps Oceanography researchers use an ATV equipped with GPS to survey sand on Southern California beaches. Voyager: What new technologies are you using to study sand, and why are they better?
Submitted by 5th grade students, Vista Grande School, San Diego, Calif.
May 01, 2008
Waves move sand along the shore and up and down beaches. Voyager: Why does sand move and how does it get from place to place?
Submitted by 5th grade students, Vista Grande School, San Diego, Calif.
May 01, 2008
Lake Mead is one human-made reservoir that captures snowmelt for San Diego in the warm dry season. Photo by Dr. Ken Dewey. Voyager: Has rainfall increased or decreased in San Diego during recent years and how has that affected our water supply?
Submitted by 7th grade students at Lewis Middle School in San Diego, Calif.
Apr 01, 2008
About two-third of the state’s water demand comes from south of San Francisco, including from cities like Los Angeles. Voyager: How does water get from Northern California to Southern California?
Submitted by 7th grade students at Lewis Middle School in San Diego, Calif.
Apr 01, 2008
A NASA satellite captured this image of a severe dust storm over the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea. Credit: NASA. Voyager: How are scientists collecting information from satellites?
Submitted by 11th and 12th grade students, Francis Parker School, San Diego, Calif.
Mar 01, 2008
NASA’s Landsat satellites captured this remarkable image of Canyonlands National Park in August 1972. Voyager: How have satellites improved in the last 50 years?
Submitted by 11th and 12th grade students at Francis Parker School, San Diego, Calif.
Mar 01, 2008
A jellyfish of the genus Crossota lives in the deep Arctic Canada Basin. Photo Courtesy Kevin Raskoff/NOAA. Voyager: How do animals survive in the deep ocean?
Submitted by 3rd grade students, Solana Vista Elementary School, Solana Beach, Calif.
Feb 01, 2008
Hawaii’s Mauna Loa is the biggest volcano on Earth and lies mostly underwater. Credit: Commander John Bortniak/NOAA Voyager: Are there big volcanoes in the deep sea?
Submitted by 3rd grade students, Solana Vista Elementary School, Solana Beach, Calif.
Feb 01, 2008
Plants generally grow a bit faster with increased carbon dioxide. Voyager: Are there any benefits of increased levels of CO2?
Submitted by National Ocean Sciences Bowl team members, San Ysidro High School, San Ysidro, Calif.
Dec 01, 2007
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