Voyager for Kids

Science questions from kids of all ages are answered by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, scientists. Ask one yourself here for a chance to win a Scripps t-shirt!

Increased levels of CO2 will most likely impact the health and expansion of coral reefs. Voyager: How is animal life being affected by the increasing levels of CO2?
Submitted by National Ocean Sciences Bowl team members, San Ysidro High School, San Ysidro, Calif.
Dec 01, 2007
A building Voyager: Why can’t scientists predict earthquakes?
Submitted by middle school participants in the Geo educational program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Nov 01, 2007
A map of faults Voyager: If San Diego is at the edge of a tectonic plate, will we always keep moving/slipping?
Submitted by students participating in the Geo program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps
Nov 01, 2007
Data from Argo floats will help scientists learn more about the world oceans, including global ocean warming and sea level rise. Voyager: To whom will Argo research be given? How will it be published and used?
Submitted by the sixth grade summer science class, Rancho Santa Fe School
Sep 01, 2007
Nearly 3,000 Argo floats have been dropped throughout the world’s oceans. Voyager: How are Argo buoys able to descend and ascend? Is there a motor?
Submitted by the sixth grade summer science class, Rancho Santa Fe School
Sep 01, 2007
Voyager: How do scientists "sample" or study a "pristine" habitat such as the Line Islands without contributing to the human impact that we are concerned with in the first place?
Submitted by 11th grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif.
Aug 01, 2007
Voyager: Is there anything we can do in San Diego to conserve coral reefs?
Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif.
Aug 01, 2007
Coral reefs Voyager: "Why is diversity so important to the world we live in?"
Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego, Calif.
Jun 01, 2007
A diver examining coral reefs Voyager: "What would happen to the coral reef ecosystem if the corals were destroyed? What would happen to the overall health of the ocean?"
Submitted by eleventh grade biology students, High Tech High Media Arts, San Diego,Calif.
Jun 01, 2007
Satellite photo of dust. Voyager: How exactly do aerosols scatter in the air, and if their time is relatively short, then why do they have a major impact in the atmosphere and temperature of the earth?
Submitted by Mrs. Gastil’s science students, San Ysidro High School
May 04, 2007
Voyager: Digging for Climate Clues
Create your own ocean floor and dig for climate clues!
May 01, 2007
Voyager: Is the chemical composition of natural and human-made aerosols the same, and which one has a greater effect on the earth's atmosphere?
Submitted by Mrs. Gastil’s science students, San Ysidro High School.
May 01, 2007
Voyager: I know that landslides can happen when storms rain on a cliff or hill, but how do landslides happen underwater?
Submitted by students in the sixth-grade geoscience program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps, La Jolla, Calif.
Apr 05, 2007
Voyager: Do Landslides Happen Every Time There’s an Earthquake?
Submitted by students in the sixth-grade geoscience program at Birch Aquarium at Scripps, La Jolla, Calif.
Apr 04, 2007
Sri Lanka Tsunami Overhead Image Tsunami - Out of the Blue

Mar 08, 2007
Ocean currents Voyager: Currents: Water on the Move

Mar 01, 2007
Fish. Voyager: What are the immediate and future consequences of polluting a fish's habitat?
Submitted by Mrs. Romero’s fourth grade class, Walter J. Porter Elementary School, San Diego, Calif.
Mar 01, 2007
Voyager: What are some consequences of certain animals invading other animals' habitats?
Submitted by Mrs. Romero’s fourth grade class, Walter J. Porter Elementary School, San Diego, Calif.
Mar 01, 2007
waves crashing over a pier Voyager: When we have an El Niño, it usually means more rain in southern California. Are other areas affected the same way?
Submitted by the National Ocean Sciences Bowl team at the Preuss School, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
Jan 18, 2007
lightning over a city Voyager: What causes the "high pressure" and "low pressure" the weatherman is always talking about?
Submitted by the National Ocean Sciences Bowl team at the Preuss School, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
Jan 16, 2007
sharknado