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oyster biosensor test deployment!

On 02 April 2019 we deployed our first prototype oyster biosensors which will measure shell gape at the same time as we are measuring the hydrodynamic and oxygen conditions. The deployment itself required some last minute MacGyvering, but we got it done! The estuary mouth started to close on 12 August 2019 in response to large waves the prior night, and is currently completely closed and filling in with fresher water from upstream. We returned yesterday, 16 April 2019 to swap out the biosensor battery and SD card to capture data over the closure. A first quick look at the first week of data looks good!

7th Seychelles field trip!

A weary set of travelers returned from the Seychelles yesterday. This trip marked the 7th trip our SLOMO group has completed! As usual, we recovered instrumentation and met with local agencies. A departure from usual – some of our longer-term moorings were not-redeployed. However we did still redeploy several instruments around Mahé. Isa is busily plugging away at her ongoing analysis of dynamics around and atop the plateau, while new postdoctoral scholar, Alma is working to write a summary paper of the dynamics atop the plateau.

Tropical reef momentum budget

Graduate student Isabella Arzeno just published the first chapter of her dissertation on examining the dynamics over coral reefs. While prior dynamical studies over coral reefs have predominantly focused on cross‐reef dynamics, this manuscript examines the along-shore dynamics. This is done through using observations of a Hawaiian fringing reef system to quantify the dominant terms in the depth‐averaged alongshore momentum budget as a function of tidal phase. Importantly, while the canonical balance is important, the observations also suggest the importance of advective acceleration at one of the sites – a term often ignored.

scripps oceanography uc san diego