Scripps in the News

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Huffington Post
Nov 29, 2016
What happens when San Diego outgrows its $1 billion expansion of Lindbergh Field? Some 17 million passengers used Lindbergh each year. Noise, safety and environmental concerns become ever more vexing as the airport is surrounded by the high-rise city that San Diego is becoming. But the ocean is wide open, and it’s right here. Why not build the world’s first major floating airport? This could be a model for other US cities on the ocean, especially in a time of rising sea level. This is the practical and visionary idea being “floated” by Dr. Walter Munk, who holds the Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Munk is widely considered the dean of world ocean scientists.

Nature
Nov 29, 2016
Both the UK and French drilling projects are funded as part of the EU collaboration. But also this season, a US team led by climatologist Jeffrey Severinghaus of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, will test the $10.5-million Rapid Access Ice Drill (also abbreviated RAID) at Minna Bluff, near the US McMurdo Station on Ross Island. Producing a hole of about 50 centimetres — wider than those of either SUBGLACIOR or the UK RAID —it is the only rapid drill that can extract rocks from the bottom of a core. Next Antarctic summer, the team will begin its hunt for the site of a 1.5-million-year-old core.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Nov 28, 2016
By Jeffrey L. Bada. Bada is a distinguished professor of marine chemistry, emeritus, at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. It is hard for scientists to comprehend what Donald Trump’s election and policies will mean for the environment, the science related to global warming and climate change, and the habitability of major parts of the Earth. Trump seems to lack any interest, understanding or appreciation of core science issues, especially those dealing with climate change, and he has called climate change a “hoax” perpetuated by the Chinese to undermine the United State’s industrial potential.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Nov 26, 2016
Seven San Diego scientists have been named as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The organization, commonly called AAAS, is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the eminent journal Science. Konstantine Georgakakos, a professor and research hydrologist at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who was recognized for his work on developing models for forecasting floods. He founded the San Diego-based Hydrologic Research Center in 1993. Lynne Talley, a professor of oceanography at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, significantly added to the understanding of ocean circulation and climate. She was a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report, which earned her a share of the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Guardian
Nov 23, 2016
Today, a global array of floats that take continuous profiles of the upper ocean monitors ocean temperatures at more than 3000 locations to depths of 2000 meters. However, this array was put in place in 2005. Prior to that, the backbone of ocean measurements was a device or probe called the expendable bathythermograph (XBT for short). These small, torpedo-like probes, deployed from ships, gather temperature data to depths of 300 to 2000 meters as they descend through the water.Background information and photos of XBT devices are provided at several sites, such as through the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

The New York Times
Nov 22, 2016
But Mati Kahru, an oceanographer at the University of California, San Diego, was skeptical. As an expert on remote sensing, he knew how hard it is to get a reliable picture of the Arctic Ocean.

Science Daily
Nov 22, 2016
A new multi-institutional study of the so-called global warming "hiatus" phenomenon -- the possible temporary slowdown of the global mean surface temperature (GMST) trend said to have occurred from 1998 to 2013 -- concludes the hiatus simply represents a redistribution of energy within Earth system, which includes the land, atmosphere and the ocean. In a paper published in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, lead author Xiao-Hai Yan of the University of Delaware, along with leading scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and University of Washington, discuss new understandings of the global warming "hiatus" phenomenon.

University of Delaware
Nov 22, 2016
A new multi-institutional study of the so-called global warming “hiatus” phenomenon — the possible temporary slowdown of the global mean surface temperature (GMST) trend said to have occurred from 1998 to 2013 — concludes the hiatus simply represents a redistribution of energy within the Earth system, which includes the land, atmosphere and the ocean. In a paper published today in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, lead author Xiao-Hai Yan of the University of Delaware, along with leading scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, discuss new understandings of the global warming “hiatus” phenomenon.

KPCC
Nov 21, 2016
The weekend rain brought the Los Angeles basin its most significant precipitation this winter. The numbers come from climatologist David Pierce of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, tracking the 'water year' — the 12-month stretch from October through September that scientists use to understand California's climate. Bacteria levels can increase significantly during and after rainstorms as contaminants in the runoff enter the ocean via storm drains, creeks and rivers, and Los Angeles County health officials are advising swimmers and surfers to stay out of the ocean for at least three days because of this storm runoff.

KPBS
Nov 21, 2016
The goal of COP22, the United Nations climate change conference held earlier this month, was to build on the Paris Agreement on global action to limit climate change. Charlotte Beall, a Ph.D. student in Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego's climate science program, attended the conference in Marrakech, Morocco. Beall discusses what was achieved at the conference and her own research on how climate affects dust.