Scripps in the News

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New Zealand Herald
Jan 15, 2015

Professor Roemmich, of the University of California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told the Herald he and colleagues had observed an ongoing trend of change in the South Pacific Gyre - a mass of circular currents that rotate anti-clockwise and dominate the circulation of the South Pacific Ocean.


LiveScience
Jan 14, 2015

Researchers are tuning in to urban seismic noise, the man-made signals from human activity, to view geologic structures and track the rhythms of cities.
Until now, scientists often tossed away data containing the pesky vibrations created as humans scurry from one place to another. Urban seismic noise often plagues scientists who study earthquakes by overwhelming seismometers, the instruments that detect earthquakes. Because of this interference, these detectors are typically placed far from airports, train tracks and freeways in order to avoid the urban buzz. "For seismologists, the focus was, 'If a train is passing, let's make sure we can remove those trains,'" said Nima Riahi, a researcher and seismologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


New Scientist
Jan 14, 2015

Could one man succeed in spurring decisive action on global warming? Pope Francis, leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics, plans to release a ground-breaking appeal to combat climate change, in a major document called an encyclical. Its message will be spread to congregations around the world by Catholic clergy, mobilising grassroots pressure for action ahead of the key UN climate summit in December in Paris. The most likely thrust of the pope's appeal will be that failure to combat climate change will condemn the world's poorest people to disproportionate harm. "The sad part is that the poorest three billion will be the worst affected by the impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise and drought, but have had least to do with causing it," says Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a climatologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and a scientific adviser to the Vatican on the encyclical.


Los Angeles Times
Jan 14, 2015

Sea level rise during the bulk of the 20th century has been overestimated, a new report suggests. The Harvard-led study, published online Wednesday in the journal Nature, knocks about half a millimeter off estimates of annual sea level rise that have been based on tide gauges. But it nonetheless confirms satellite data showing that the annual rate has sharply accelerated since the 1990s. From 1993 to 2010, however, the annual rate of sea level rise leaps to about 3 millimeters per year, the researchers found. The new calculations will have to be corroborated, said oceanographer Reinhard Flick of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who was not involved in the study. If so, Flick added, the revision makes the recent acceleration "significantly larger than previously supposed.”


Nature
Jan 14, 2015

“The worst thing that can happen to science is to get mixed up in politics,” says Francisco Valero, a retired climate scientist who was at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and led the satellite’s original Earth-science team. “That is what happened to us.


Nature
Jan 14, 2015

Other researchers are even less sympathetic to Duarte's thesis. One is atmospheric physicist Ralph Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, whose work is criticized in the paper. In 2010, Keeling and his co-authors suggested that in the future the problem of low oxygen levels in water, now seen in 'dead zones' off many coasts, could spread on a global scale3. Duarte and his team do not present evidence to the contrary, but they suggest that it is wrong to call this a 'calamity'.

But Keeling, who leads programmes on atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, says that his paper did not use the term calamity. Instead, it called the issue “a potentially serious consequence of global warming”.

Duarte's paper “is kind of committing the same sin it’s railing against in the casting of this as a series of calamities”, says Keeling. “The literature doesn’t call it calamites. That’s their own hyperbolic language.”


High Country News
Jan 13, 2015

From politicians to climate scientists, meet 10 people under 30 who are shaping the region’s future. Off the coast of California lie some of the planet’s richest marine ecosystems, undersea menageries that put coral reefs to shame. “You see scallops, rockfish, cabezon, mussels, sea lions. … It’s a whole secret world,” says Emily Callahan. These oceanic Edens, believe it or not, are the accidental byproducts of California’s offshore oil rigs, whose struts and beams shelter species up and down the food chain. And if Callahan and her partner in conservation, Amber Jackson, have their way, the Golden State’s drilling platforms will remain habitat for decades to come. Callahan and Jackson weren’t always rig aficionados. But when the duo met in a scientific diving course at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, where they were both master’s students, they agreed to study the rigs together.


ABC Radio National
Jan 13, 2015

Despite being a beach-loving nation with well seasoned swimmers and surfers, most of us would probably have no idea that beneath the water there are waves hundreds of metres high. They're known as 'internal tides', and scientists believe they have an important effect on the climate. Professor Matthew Alford, an oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, is part of a ten-week research trip to the Tasman Sea to study these waves. Matthew joins Summer Breakfast from the deck of the research ship, "Roger Revelle”.


KCET
Jan 12, 2015

Rising CO2 levels are disrupting the natural balance of the ocean and posing a threat to oysters and marine mammals in California. 22 million metric tons of CO2 gets absorbed by the ocean everyday, making the sea much more acidic than it would naturally be, according to Patrick Krug, marine biologist and professor at Cal State Los Angeles. Oysters and other shellfish are impacted by the effects of ocean acidification and CO2 emissions. Changes in the ocean's carbon chemistry can pose a threat to oyster shells by causing growth deformities, according to Davey Kline, marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. If CO2 levels continue to rise, we might not see any future generations of oysters or other shellfish, Kline explained.


Climate Central
Jan 12, 2015

The new year has only just begun, but we’ve already recorded our first days with average carbon dioxide levels above 400 parts per million, potentially leading to many months in a row above this threshold, experts say. Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego's records of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels show that Jan. 1 was the first day of the new year above that concentration, followed by Jan. 3 and Jan. 7. “My guess at this point is that January 2015 will be very slightly above 400 ppm, but it's too early to tell for sure,” Ralph Keeling, the scientist in charge of the CO2 monitoring project atop Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, said in an email. Keeling’s father, Charles, began the project in 1958.