Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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Los Angeles Times
Apr 10, 2015

Your smartphone is a camera, a calculator, a flashlight and a pedometer. Scientists believe it could be part of an earthquake early-warning system too. It turns out that the GPS sensors built into most smartphones are sensitive enough to detect the earliest signs of quakes that are magnitude 7 and stronger, new research shows. The data they collect could be used to give nearby communities a few seconds’ notice that seismic waves are headed their way. Yehuda Bock, a geodesist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, who studies ways of using GPS to detect quakes and other natural hazards, said that although the paper is technically sound, he is not sure that the cellphone network would be very practical.“I’m a little skeptical it will work in a real-world situation,” said Bock, who was not involved in the research. “I think a system like that would false-alarm more than they claim in the paper.”


Nature World News
Apr 10, 2015

It's no secret that North America has seen some pretty odd weather recently. No, it's not nearly as disastrous as some excitable folks on Twitter make it out to be, but it is odd enough for the NOAA and meteorological associations to take notice. Now new research has revealed that a natural phenomenon called "The Blob" might be a primary cause behind this weird weather. Back in July, for instance, students from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego witnessed a massive anchovy school swim far closer to shore than normal.


U-T San Diego
Apr 09, 2015

A fatal cancer devastating soft-shell clams along the East Coast originated from a single primordial source, according to a study published Thursday. Leukemic cells from one clam metastasized through hundreds of miles of ocean water, Stephen P. Goff of Columbia University, the study's senior author, said in an interview. The disease eventually kills most of the clams it infects. William Gerwick, a UC San Diego scientist not involved in the study said its researchers amassed "strong evidence" that the cancer cells arose from a single individual source. But the study is not definitive, because researchers didn't do experiments to demonstrate that cells from a leukemic clam could infect healthy clams, said Gerwick, a professor of oceanography and pharmaceutical science at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego.


U-T San Diego
Apr 09, 2015

Nearly three months ago, climate scientist Richard Somerville, now a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, turned the Doomsday Clock from five minutes to three minutes before midnight, human zero hour. In the countdown’s history, the only time more menacing than 2015 was 1953, the year of hydrogen bomb testing. In 2007, the Bulletin welcomed a non-nuclear factor into the apocalyptic equation: climate change. The same year, Somerville — professor emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and author of “The Forgiving Air,” a popular and accessible guide to climate change — joined the Bulletin’s time-sensitive doomsayers.


NBC 7
Apr 08, 2015

Professor Neil Driscoll with Scripps Institution of Oceanography said the black oil balls are evidence of a natural oil seep from the ocean floor.


National Snow and Ice Data Center
Apr 07, 2015

After reaching its seasonal maximum on February 25, the beginning of the melt season was interrupted by late-season periods of ice growth, largely in the Bering Sea, Davis Strait and around Labrador. Near the end of March, extent rose to within about 83,000 square kilometers (32,000 square miles) of the February 25 value. The monthly average Arctic sea ice extent for March was the lowest in the satellite record. A recent publication by a colleague at  Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego describes the impact of foehn or chinook patterns on ice shelf and sea ice stability in the region, making use of the network of Automated Meteorology-Ice-Geophysics Observing Systems (AMIGOS) in the area.


NBC 7
Apr 07, 2015

A Southern California desalination plant set to open this fall will be the largest in the Western Hemisphere and the only water supply in San Diego not dependent on rainfall or a snowpack. When the facility opens, it should generate 50 million gallons of potable water each day. That’s enough water for 300,000 residents, or 7 percent of the county of San Diego. Studies by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have shown no negative impact on the environment, Jones said, though environmentalists are still concerned about the plant's effect on the local fish and marine life populations.


Statesman Journal
Apr 06, 2015

Seaborne radiation from Japan's Fukushima nuclear disaster has reached North America. Woods Hole chemical oceanographer Ken Buesseler emphasized that the radiation is at very low levels that aren't expected to harm human health or the environment. Buesseler's group teamed with a Canadian-funded program called InFORM. It will add about a dozen monitoring stations along the coast of British Columbia. Cruises with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego will add about 10 new sampling sites offshore.

 


Science Magazine
Apr 06, 2015

A new study looks at seven sardine species over 25 years and finds that overfishing exacerbates natural boom-and-bust cycles of the fish, which are not only a food source for humans but for countless larger marine animals. Climate change makes the problem even tougher. “It’s an excellent study, but the large omission here is that of climate, and we know that climate drives the dynamics of many of the stocks that they studied,” says David Checkley of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, who was not involved in the new work.


Discover Magazine
Apr 02, 2015

What flies above has radically changed our knowledge of what lies beneath. New maps of Earth’s seafloors derived from satellite data have identified thousands of previously unknown seamounts, faults and other tectonic features. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, created the maps by analyzing untapped data streams from NASA’s Jason satellite and the European Space Agency’s CryoSat-2 satellite.