Scripps in the News

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Los Angeles Times
Mar 09, 2017
The discovery of missing links between earthquake faults shows how a magnitude 7.4 earthquake could rupture in the same temblor underneath Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties, a new study finds. But to get to a 7.4, the earthquake would not only have to again rupture the Newport-Inglewood fault in Los Angeles and Orange counties. The temblor would also have to jolt the adjacent Rose Canyon fault system, which runs all the way through downtown San Diego and hasn’t ruptured since roughly 1650. “These two fault zones are actually one continuous fault zone,” said Valerie Sahakian, the study’s lead author, who wrote it while working on her doctorate at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

USA Today
Mar 08, 2017
Southern California could be in for some serious shaking.Scientists uncovered a newly identified fault line that could unleash a magnitude-7.4 earthquake in the region, which other researchers say is already long overdue for a whopper of a temblor along the infamous San Andreas fault. In the first study, the newly identified fault line is mostly offshore but never more than four miles from the San Diego, Orange County, and Los Angeles County coast, said study lead author Valerie Sahakian, formerly of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and now with the U.S. Geological Survey.

KCET
Mar 08, 2017
A longer more dangerous fault system. The Newport –Inglewood fault that triggered the Long Beach quake is 46 miles long. But seismologists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in La Jolla have recently discovered it’s actually a lot longer. That’s because they have found that the Rose Canyon fault off the coast of San Diego is part of the same system. This longer fault system runs from south of San Diego to Los Angeles. Seismologist say the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault could produce a 7.4 quake. That is more powerful than previously believed.

CW6 San Diego
Mar 08, 2017
At the South Pole the view, the air, the wind and the vast plains are all like being on a different planet. “It’s as hot as 20 degrees and cold as minus 25,” Peter Bromirski, a researcher with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, spends 5 weeks at a time near the Earth’s southernmost point. His team, many from Scripps Institution of Oceanography are measuring the frequency and strength of vibrations within the Ross Ice Shelf. That’s Antarctica’s largest and most stable ice shelf. Glenn McClure is a composer who traveled with Bromirski’s team, capturing the sounds of their research, “my job is to give the ice a true voice by translating the numbers into music.”

The Orange County Register
Mar 07, 2017
The re-identified fault, which includes the Newport-Inglewood and Rose Canyon lines, runs between Los Angeles and San Diego and could set off a 7.4 magnitude quake, according to a report published Tuesday in the Journal of Geophysical Research by scientists from UC San Diego and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

CW6 San Diego
Mar 07, 2017
A fault system that runs from San Diego to Los Angeles is capable of producing up to magnitude 7.3 earthquakes if the offshore segments rupture and a 7.4 if the southern onshore segment also ruptures, according to an analysis led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Mar 07, 2017
The Scripps Institution of Oceanography on Tuesday raised the attention level for two earthquake faults, saying they’re actually a single system that could produce devastating temblors affecting Tijuana to the Los Angeles region. If offshore segments of the Newport-Inglewood and Rose Canyon fault system ruptured, they could generate a magnitude 7.3 quake capable of damaging much of the Southern California coastline, according to the scientists at Scripps, which is part of UC San Diego.

Los Angeles Times
Mar 02, 2017
Traditionally considered the end of California’s rain season, the April 1 snowpack is the bar by which the success of each year’s winter is measured. As of Wednesday, the average snowpack across the entire range was at 185% of normal conditions for the first day of March and at 163% of the April 1 average, the Department of Water Resources said. Since the water year began Oct. 1, California has enjoyed a constant stream of atmospheric river events that have filled reservoirs and rivers and helped replenish aquifers. About 40% of the state’s water comes through atmospheric rivers, and in an average year, the state can count on about a dozen of them, said F. Martin Ralph, the director of UC San Diego’s Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

CW6 San Diego
Mar 02, 2017
Several carcasses of leopard sharks have been spotted along Dog Beach in Ocean Beach after Monday’s strong storm. This is a rare sign of stress among the species and an occurrence marine biologist & shark researcher Andrew Nosal with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego believes is worth looking into, ”it’s interesting it happened a day after a big storm. It does seem related to the rain somehow.” Nosal says pollution may be to blame, “it’s possible the sharks were poisoned or there’s toxins in the water.” As Nosal points out, we know the water along San Diego’s coast is not always safe enough for humans after heavy storms so it may not be safe enough for some marine life either.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Mar 01, 2017
The oldest fossils of life, remnants of bacteria possibly dating back nearly 4.3 billion years ago, have been identified in northeastern Canada, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. If confirmed, the study will add to growing evidence that life on Earth emerged relatively quickly after the planet formed about 4.5 billion years ago. It also may have implications for the search for signs of life on Mars, which around that time was a warmer, wet world resembling Earth. No so fast, says prominent origin of life researcher Jeffrey Bada of UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. After a quick read of the study, Bada, who has also studied marine geochemistry, said he was skeptical that the authors had proven their case or surmounted objections to similar finds