Scripps in the News

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Phys.org
May 13, 2015

Inspired by the way iridescent bird feathers play with light, scientists have created thin films of material in a wide range of pure colors -- from red to green -- with hues determined by physical structure rather than pigments. The colors are exceptionally uniform across the films, according to precise measurements by Dimitri Deheyn, a research scientist at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography who studies how a wide variety of organisms use light and color to communicate.


Phys.Org
May 12, 2015

The Larsen C Ice Shelf—whose neighbours Larsen A and B, collapsed in 1995 and 2002—is thinning from both its surface and beneath. For years scientists were unable to determine whether it is warming air temperatures or warmer ocean currents that is causing the Antarctic Peninsula's floating ice shelves to lose volume and become more vulnerable to collapse. This new study takes an important step forward in assessing Antarctica's likely contribution to future sea-level rise. The study was carried out by scientists from British Antarctic Survey, the United States Geological Survey, University of Colorado, University of Kansas, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


Time
May 12, 2015

It sounds like a children’s nursery tale; a single whale roams the ocean calling out at a unique frequency, looking for friends but finding none. Scientists have spent decades trying to trace the mammal but though its strange haunting call has been heard frequently since 1989, it’s never been found. But is the whale really ‘lonely’? Some are skeptical that the whale is really alone at all. According to John Hildebrand, a professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the whale’s call has been gradually deepening. Its call could be now around 47Hz and this has been observed in other blue whales around the world which suggests it is unusual but not unique.


KPBS
May 11, 2015

Climatologists have recently confirmed carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere have surpassed 400 parts per million, the highest level of CO2 seen in thousands of years. They say this is part of ongoing proof that human-induced climate change continues, but what that means for human civilization remains an unanswered question. "Climate change is the most important challenge human society faces in this century," said Charles Kennel, a climate scientist and distinguished professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. "We are entering a world new to human experience, and we do not know what is going to happen. We can only know what has happened."


U-T San Diego
May 10, 2015

From oceanography to cellular technology, the San Diego region has always embraced research and innovation. UC San Diego is the country’s sixth-largest research university, a touchstone flanked by such life science giants as the Salk Institute and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.


ABC News
May 10, 2015

Video segment features SUP, Science and graduate student Phil Bresnahan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

 


CBS Innovate 8
May 09, 2015

Video segment features SUP, Science and graduate student Phil Bresnahan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

 


KPBS
May 07, 2015

Scientists from around the globe met at UC San Diego this week to decipher the mystery of the so-called “blob,” a large patch of warm water found in the Pacific Ocean. Art Miller, a climate researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, described the blob's magnitude as "intimidating."


NBC 7
May 05, 2015

San Diego scientists are working to figure out how to explain “the blob,” a nine degree temperature increase in the North Pacific Ocean that is leaving scientists with a lot of questions.

On Tuesday, the scientists met for the first of a two part workshop at UC San Diego during the 2014 to 2015 Pacific Anomalies Science and Technology Workshop.


10 News
May 05, 2015

Scientists from the US, Canada and Mexico are here discussing the blob at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.