Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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The Guardian
Apr 28, 2015

Moving water means making electricity. But the drought is making that harder to do. The lack of water has put a serious crimp in the hydroelectric line at Hoover Dam and other power plants across the west, limiting an inexpensive and pollution-free energy source that once was considered endless. As Lake Mead shrinks, the Hoover Dam has been trying to avoid ‘dead pool’ status – the point at which hydropower can no longer be generated. In 2008, a Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, research paper asked the provocative question, When Will Lake Mead Go Dry? The study predicted the lake had a 50-50 shot at achieving that fate by 2021, given current trends. “The system is in deep trouble,” said Tim Barnett, one of the study’s lead authors.


U-T San Diego
Apr 28, 2015

As the state’s record-setting drought continues, San Diego’s congressional representatives on Monday laid out ways the federal government can help avoid catastrophic water shortfalls in the future. Rep. Scott Peters, D-San Diego, said agreements between federal agencies and other organizations might provide some solutions. For example, as the state invests in surface storage, the Army Corps of Engineers and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego are trying to make sure reservoirs are as efficient as possible.

 


U-T San Diego
Apr 28, 2015

Five San Diego scientists have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the elite honor and research society that Congress founded during the Lincoln administration. The new members include: Jeffrey Severinghaus, a paleoclimatologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. He specializes in the study of abrupt climate change. Lisa Tauxe, a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. She is an expert on Earth’s geomagnetic field.


National Catholic Reporter
Apr 28, 2015

The Vatican summit Tuesday on climate change and sustainable development brought together a mix of researchers and religious leaders “to help strengthen the global consensus on the importance of climate change in the context of sustainable development,” according to the event’s program. Ahead of the event, NCR heard from several of its participants, including Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a professor of atmospheric and climate sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


Scientific American
Apr 27, 2015

On 28 April, scientists, religious figures and policymakers will gather at the Vatican to discuss the science of global warming and the danger posed to the world’s poorest people. Among the moral arguments for action on climate change is the idea that society must preserve Earth for future generations, says another meeting organizer, climate scientist Veerabhadran Ramanathan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego.


The Washington Post
Apr 26, 2015

Once the largest U.S. water reservoir, Lake Mead has faded to fourth place as it has lost water. In 2008, a Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego research paper asked the provocative question, “When Will Lake Mead Go Dry?” The study predicted the lake had a 50-50 shot at achieving that fate by 2021, given current trends. “The system is in deep trouble,” said Tim Barnett, one of the study’s lead authors.


NOAA
Apr 23, 2015

The American Chemical Society will designate the Keeling Curve – a long-term record of rising carbon dioxide in the planet’s atmosphere -- as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a ceremony April 30 at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. In March 1958, on a remote mountain slope at a newly established U.S. Weather Bureau observatory, the late geochemist Charles David Keeling of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, began taking measurements of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.


Climate Central
Apr 21, 2015

We tend to focus on land surface temperatures, because, well, that’s where we live. But surface heat is but a fraction of the climate change equation. Only 7 percent of the heat being trapped by greenhouse gases is sticking around in the surface and atmosphere of the planet. The other 93 percent? That's ending up in the ocean, though some scientists expect some of that heat will eventually find its way back to the surface and trigger even more warming. “We continue to be stunned at how rapidly the ocean is warming,” Sarah Gille, a  professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, told Climate Central last year.


Los Angeles Times
Apr 19, 2015

Ever since an unusually warm mass of seawater began spreading along the Pacific Coast of North America a year ago — wreaking havoc on the marine food chain — scientists have struggled to explain its presence.In recent months, however, some experts have argued that this 500-mile-wide, 300-foot-deep wedge of warm seawater may in fact signal an epic cyclical change in the Pacific Ocean — a change that could possibly bring soaking rains to Southern California this winter but also accelerate the rise in global temperatures. At Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, climate researcher Dan Cayan said he was "cautiously pessimistic" over what the blob signaled about the future.


Phys.org
Apr 17, 2015

Researchers at PNNL developed a new way for global climate and weather forecasting models to represent cumulus clouds, accounting for updrafts and downdrafts in a manner that is far more accurate, regardless of the scale of the model. Researchers at PNNL and collaborators from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and NASA Langley Research Center plugged real-world data into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate three storms: two over the U.S. Southern Great Plains in May of 2011 during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment and one in the western Pacific near Australia in January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment.