Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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National Geographic
Jan 29, 2016
Manta rays, which are among the bigger and more charismatic animals in the ocean, have captured humans' imagination for generations. And yet scientists still have many unanswered questions about rays' behavior. To answer some of these questions, and to find information that could stem population decline, National Geographic's Crittercam team joined forces with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in southern California and the Manta Trust in the U.K. to attach cameras to wild mantas. We spoke with Scripps and Manta Trust researcher Joshua Stewart about the Crittercam project.

ABC 10 NEWS
Jan 26, 2016
Despite a recent stretch of warm weather in San Diego, climate experts say there is still a good chance for more strong El Niño storms for the next 2-3 months. Experts from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the Desert Research Institute, and UC Santa Barbara delivered the "California Winter Status Update" on Tuesday. They said El Niño's warmer ocean temperatures will stick around until mid- to late spring.

The Washington Post
Jan 26, 2016
On Tuesday, the people who keep the Doomsday Clock announced that they have — not adjusted it. The clock is still set three minutes to midnight. The clock was previously set at 5 minutes to midnight until it moved up to 3 minutes this time last year, reflecting climate change trends. Professor Richard Somerville of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego unveils the “Doomsday Clock” showing that the world is now three minutes away from nuclear disaster, from five minutes previously, during a press conference of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists in Washington, DC on January 22, 2015.

KPBS
Jan 25, 2016
Sea cliffs have crumbled and several beaches in North County have eroded down to pebbles by high tides and El Niño storms. This winter may reveal how expensive it would be to preserve San Diego beaches as sea levels rise. Robert Guza, professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, said places that flood intermittently now could find themselves flooded on a daily basis in the long term. He said this winter’s king tides and El Niño storms will give us a glimpse into the future of sea level rise.

Smithsonian.com
Jan 25, 2016
Don't worry: When the drillers eventually pierce the mantle, hot molten rock won’t surge up the hole and spill onto the seafloor in a volcanic eruption. Although mantle rocks do flow, they do so at a speed akin to the growth rate of a fingernail, says Holly Given, a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego.

KPBS
Jan 22, 2016
“If we actually get folks taking pictures from the same locations, pointed in the same direction, repeatedly — so say, every day or every week — that’s actually the most valuable data for us,” said Sarah Giddings, a researcher and professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

KPBS
Jan 21, 2016
San Diego has stayed pretty dry after an early burst of El Niño-driven storms drenched Southern California in early January. But recent storms in Northern California have kept rain and snow levels climbing steadily. "Northern California has been getting some precipitation recently, which is good," said David Pierce, a climate researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego who helped compile data for the KPBS Drought Tracker.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Jan 21, 2016
A storm with 80 mph winds once forced Hubert Staudigel to stay in his tent for eight straight days during a research expedition to Mount Erebus, an active volcano on that frigid continent. “We couldn’t create heat because it would have melted ice on the tent, causing it to rain inside,” said Staudigel, a geophysicist at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. In the past, the public rarely heard about the triumphs and travails of Scripps’ scientists, who work everywhere from Earth’s two poles to the deserts of Africa to the deepest reaches of the Pacific. That’s about to change. Scripps operates the nearby Birch Aquarium, which is undergoing a major makeover designed to give the institution the ability to broadly showcase its field research, including work conducted on its research ships.

San Diego Magazine
Jan 21, 2016
I meet fascinating people on the Mesa and want to learn who they are, apart from the science. So the pressure has been mounting as I put off writing about our colorful conversation, worried I would not do his story justice. Who is this intriguing mystery man I speak of? None other than the quirky yet legendary B. Greg Mitchell. Greg is an explorer, who travels the world studying algae. Trips to Antarctica and the Arctic and Central Pacific are the norm for this globetrotter and he has been known to practice his yoga headstand on a meter of Arctic sea ice. His current work is the study of microalgae photosynthesis from laboratory, to commercial, to global ocean scales. At the ripe age of 13 he set out to become a Marine Biologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, where he could surf daily at Black’s.

San Diego Reader
Jan 20, 2016
Every day under the Scripps pier in La Jolla, two cameras capture thousands of images of the weird and wonderful organisms called plankton.