Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
NOTE: Links to external sites may unexpectedly change or be removed by the owner. Every attempt will be made to keep links to media outlets from this page accurate.


UC San Diego News
Oct 01, 2015
<p>For Matt Leslie, a doctoral student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, science communication is a passion. Leslie studies whales and dolphins, trying to understand species diversity and how to improve conservation efforts for these populations. &ldquo;I love teaching&mdash;whether in a classroom or just informally talking about my research,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I also know how important it is to be able to communicate what I do.&rdquo; When he heard about a new four-day, immersive communication workshop for UC San Diego graduate students, Leslie didn&rsquo;t hesitate to sign up. What he got was an experience that went beyond the average public speaking training. Leslie was one of 30 graduate students to participate in Inspiring Research: Creative Strategies for Communication.</p>

New Scientist
Sep 30, 2015
<p><span>SOME earthquakes seem to hit in a seasonal pattern &ndash; and no one knows why. &ldquo;Physically, it doesn&rsquo;t make any sense,&rdquo; says Zhongwen Zhan. Zhan, of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in California, and his colleague Peter Shearer examined a global catalogue of earthquakes that have occurred since 1900. Out of 60 large, deep quakes in the catalogue, 42 hit between April and October. The trend doesn&rsquo;t appear in shallower or smaller quakes, but stands out clearly for those above magnitude 7.0 and at a depth greater than 500 kilometres.</span></p>

National Geographic
Sep 29, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. During a single fishing season, up to 2 million corvinas can be caught in just 25 days of labor, flooding the market, dropping the prices and forcing local communities to fish more and more in an attempt to make a profit. By the time the market shuts down, several tons of corvine that have already been caught end up in landfills wasting not only the fish, but also the eggs that would replenish the stock. &ldquo;This vicious circle repeats over and over triggered by and illusion of plenty&rdquo; explains Octavio Aburto, a professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, &ldquo;We are still unable to accurately estimate the real abundance of a fish stock and fishers go on for several years, harvesting the same amount, confident that the stock is stable because there is no decline in the catch. But often, they are surpassing the capacity of the population to recover and one year, suddenly, they harvest the last sizeable catch and the fishery collapses.&rdquo;</span></p>

10 News
Sep 29, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">A Coronado surfer recorded the encounter of a lifetime </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_237971360" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Tuesday</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> morning with a 20-foot long gray whale. Daron Case says the whale came within a few feet of him and his surf buddies off Silver Strand State Beach. But his joy at coming within arms-length of the majestic marine mammal is tempered by concerns it may be sick. Case couldn&#39;t help but notice the whale&#39;s lethargic behavior: &quot;It did have a lot of barnacles and it looked very skinny,&quot; he said. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego also told 10News the whale appeared to be thin and unhealthy. They said all those old barnacles could be an indication that the whale is old, or that it could be in poor health.</span></p>

BBC News
Sep 28, 2015
<p>&quot;The strength of heat coming up from below the surface has been as strong as the heat coming down from the Sun,&quot; said the mission&#39;s chief scientist, Jennifer MacKinnon, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.</p>

USNI News
Sep 28, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">The Navy accepted deliver of the oceanographic research vessel R/V Neil Armstrong (AGOR-27) on Sept. 23 at the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. The ship is the first of two in its class and features a single-hull 238-foot-long commercial design, with room for a crew of 20 and as many as 24 scientists. Neil Armstrong and its sister ship, R/V Sally Ride (AGOR-28), will conduct coastal and deep ocean research with oceanographic research organizations under charter agreements. Neil Armstrong will be operated by researchers with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Sally Ride will collaborate with scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego &ndash; where Ride worked as a professor and scientist during her career.</span></p>

10 News
Sep 25, 2015
<p>Scientists were back out along Imperial Beach Thursday, a day after releasing bright pink dye into the water.&nbsp;&quot;What we&#39;re doing is we&#39;re putting fake &#39;pollution&#39; in the water and&nbsp;we&#39;re tracking it,&quot; Professor Falk Feddersen with Scripps Institution of&nbsp;Oceanography&nbsp;at UC San Diego&nbsp;said.&nbsp;Teams were stationed in green tents, guarding instruments that measure&nbsp;the concentration of dye in the water. The bright pink dye is non-toxic.</p>

10 News
Sep 25, 2015
<p>New numbers back up what many have probably noticed this summer -- the ocean temperature is rising. &quot;These are some of the consequences of the warming, I&#39;m pretty sure,&quot;&nbsp;said John McGowan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. San Diego&#39;s coastal waters haven&#39;t been this warm since 1931. &quot;Well, there are big changes going on in the Pacific,&quot; McGowan added. Scripps Institution of Oceanography has kept records here for 99 years, and our ocean, is like a sponge.</p>

Los Angeles Times
Sep 25, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: monospace; font-size: 10.4000005722046px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">In a victory for SeaWorld, the staff of the California Coastal Commission has recommended the approval of a permit to build an expanded holding facility for the&nbsp;theme park&#39;s killer whales, despite opposition from animal rights groups. The Coastal Commission, a state panel with authority to approve or deny construction&nbsp;projects along the state&#39;s coastal areas, is set </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_866647494" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: monospace; font-size: 10.4000005722046px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Oct. 8</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: monospace; font-size: 10.4000005722046px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> to vote on a plan to expand and replace SeaWorld&#39;s existing holding facility with a new 450,000-gallon pool&nbsp;and a 5.2 million-gallon tank. &ldquo;The proposed Blue World project will provide not only an expanded habitat for whales, but also new opportunities for researchers to&nbsp;conduct studies that will benefit killer whales and other cetaceans in the wild,&rdquo; said Paul Ponganis, a research physiologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography&nbsp;at UC San Diego, in a statement released by SeaWorld. &ldquo;In addition, a dynamic animal environment like Blue World may inspire a host of future marine biologists,&nbsp;veterinarians, and other scientists.&rdquo;</span></p>

New Scientist
Sep 24, 2015
<p>Some earthquakes seem to hit in a seasonal pattern &ndash; and no one knows why.&nbsp;Zhongwen Zhan&nbsp;of the California Institute of Technology and&nbsp;Peter Shearer&nbsp;of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego examined a global catalogue&nbsp;of&nbsp;earthquakes that have occurred since 1900. Out of 60 large, deep&nbsp;earthquakes in the catalogue, 42 occurred between the months of April&nbsp;and October.&nbsp;The seasonal trend doesn&rsquo;t appear in shallower earthquakes or in&nbsp;smaller tremors, but stands out clearly for earthquakes above magnitude&nbsp;7.0 and at a&nbsp;depth greater than 500 kilometres. An explanation remains&nbsp;elusive. &ldquo;Physically, it doesn&rsquo;t make any sense,&rdquo; Zhan says.</p>