Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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NPR
Dec 19, 2014

A ship full of marine scientists is floating over the deepest part of the world: the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench. They're sending down probes to study life in one of the most hostile environments on the planet. This week the researchers are targeting the two deepest spots in the trench — the Sirena Deep and the Challenger Deep — which each extend down about 7 miles beneath the ocean's surface. Douglas Bartlett, from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, is the chief scientist aboard the research vessel Falkor, which is operated by the Schmidt Ocean Institute. Bartlett describes undersea trenches like the Mariana, which stretches hundreds of miles across the floor of the western Pacific, as "inverted islands of biodiversity."


NBC News
Dec 19, 2014

Researchers say they have spotted the deepest living fish ever found — a sea ghost of a snailfish that floated past their video camera at a depth of 26,716 feet (8,143 meters) in the Mariana Trench. The expedition team, led by University of Hawaii marine scientists Jeff Drazen and Patty Fryer, say the white translucent fish with winglike fins and an eel-like tail represents a previously unknown variety of deep-sea creature. Doug Bartlett, a marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who participated in an earlier HADES expedition, said the deepest-fish claim was merited. "Drazen and colleagues have obtained the deepest fish yet recovered," he told NBC News in an email.


AGU Blogosphere: GeoSpace
Dec 17, 2014

The Northern Hemisphere suddenly cooled about 12,800 years ago in an event named the Younger Dryas. Scientists have debated the cause for many years. Recently, scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts discovered a massive deposit of Arctic seafloor sediment consistent with a huge flood coming down the Mackenzie River about 13,000 years ago. Shannon Klotsko, a PhD candidate at Scripps, presented the team’s findings in a poster session Monday afternoon at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. “Did it cause the Younger Dryas? The timing seems right, but there’s been some discussion about what lakes it was sourced from,” said Klotsko.


Wired
Dec 17, 2014

Depending on the time of day and the season of the year, the air you walk through and pull into your lungs changes more than you might expect. This is just one of many discoveries by Ralph Keeling, a scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, who tests the atmosphere the way a police officer might test your breath with a Breathalyzer. For more than two decades Keeling has been measuring the oxygen content of air samples that are collected daily in Hawaii, Antarctica, and elsewhere, sealed into small containers, and shipped to his lab in La Jolla, California. Like traces of alcohol in someone’s breath, slight changes in the composition of the atmosphere can tell a lot about what the world’s combined masses of people, vegetation, and plankton are doing.


Orange County Register
Dec 16, 2014

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, have begun tracking the effects of winter storms and assessing the effectiveness of coastal protection projects such as beach berms. The Seal Beach Winter Storm Beach and Wave Monitoring Project, funded by the USC Sea Grant office and the California Department of Parks and Recreation, began Nov. 19 and will run through March 15. It will enable researchers to observe beach dynamics through an entire storm season. The researchers will measure waves, tides, water levels and the evolution of sand levels, said project principal investigator Timu Gallien, a postdoctoral researcher at Scripps.


Popular Science
Dec 16, 2014

For the third year in a row, California has suffered severe drought. Reservoirs hit all-time lows, wildfires raced through dry forests, and some towns ran out of water. New techniques for measuring water near and on the surface will add resolution to that picture in 2015. Researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego found that tiny uplifts in the Earth’s crust reveal the amount of water lost throughout the West.


NBC News
Dec 15, 2014

New data from the Earth's last big warmup, some 56 million years ago, may offer a sneak peek into what today's climate change may eventually look like. Scientists have determined that the rate at which carbon emissions heated up the planet during the late Paleocene is much more similar to modern human-caused warming than many experts previously thought, a new report published Monday in Nature Geoscience shows. "If you're looking for an ancient analogue to what is happening now to see how bad it's likely to be, this is the whole thing," said Richard Norris, a professor of paleobiology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


The Oceanography Society
Dec 15, 2014

Women now head three—half—of the six oceanographic institutions featured in our 2005 paper. Margret Leinen is Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Virginia Armbrust is Director of the University of Washington College of Oceanography, and Susan Avery is President and Director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. This issue features profiles on a number of women at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, including: Teresa Chereskin, Research Oceanographer; Sarah N. Giddings, Assistant Professor; Sarah Gille, Professor of Physical Oceanography; Jennifer MacKinnon, Associate Professor; Janet Sprintall, Research Oceanographer; and Miriam Kastner, Distinguished Professor. "I have spent most of my career at Scripps Institution of Oceanography—a great place to work," said Kastner. "I particularly enjoyed working with the bright Scripps students and the wonderful interdisciplinary faculty, using its top-tier facilities, and taking advantage of seagoing opportunities. I am delighted to see the significant progress over the past ~ 30 years in how women are perceived, in the support young women scientists receive, and in the scientific impact women have on their fields of research.”


The Star
Dec 15, 2014

Andrew Praskovsky, a 42-year-old from Colorado, made a pilgrimage to his native Russia every year. But in April 2012, his trip was cut short when U.S. federal agents descended on him at the airport to seize contraband from his luggage. Their booty? More than 1.8 kilograms of illegally extracted paddlefish caviar from a sleepy stretch of the Osage River, just downstream from the Harry S. Truman Dam, about a two-hour drive southeast of Kansas City. Praskovsky was charged with trafficking and will go on trial in March. He was one of eight men arrested during “Operation Roadhouse,” an investigation led by U.S. Fish and Wildlife that looked more like a high-stakes drug-ring bust, complete with undercover agents. “There is potentially an even greater market for caviar in Russia and Asia than in the U.S.,” says Phaedra Doukakis-Leslie, a professor from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who has discovered intentionally mislabelled paddlefish roe through genetic sampling.


Star Tribune
Dec 12, 2014

Researchers have re-created a split-second impact of a meteor with primordial Earth, and shown how the 3.5-megaton collision might have reorganized common molecules into some of the early building blocks that led to all life. The researchers zapped clay and a chemical soup with the laser to simulate the energy of a speeding asteroid smashing into the planet. They ended up creating what can be considered crucial pieces of the building blocks of life. “There is no known geochemically feasible process for the generation of pure formamide in a plausible primitive Earth environment,” said Jeffrey Bada, a chemist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego.