Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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The Orange County Register
Apr 24, 2016
On Balboa Island, during especially high tides, water from the bay burbles up through cracks in the sidewalk and laps at the top of 80-year-old sea walls, which loom several feet above lower-lying walkways. It’s an occasional nuisance. But scientists say that within the lifetime of people now being born, such flooding, exacerbated by ever higher tides and storm surges, will become increasingly common in several Orange County coastal communities as sea levels rise as much as several feet. “Something that wouldn’t have been a big flood previously will become a much more significant flood,” said Timu Gallien, who researches sea level rise at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Most coastal Orange County cities are beginning to act by incorporating sea level rise projections into planning documents and general plan updates, but many scientists and officials warn it’s too little and coming too slowly.

Cape Cod Times
Apr 24, 2016
Whales, like humans, sometimes look for love in the wrong places. So it may be with "52," a whale with an underwater call at a unique, 52-hertz frequency, which may be looking and looking and looking for true love, with no success — at least according to a documentary that’s in the works based on the research of the late Falmouth oceanographer William Watkins. Scientists have picked up the unique calls for the past five years off southern California, according to Ana Sirovic, an oceanographer with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who was part of the October trip. While Scripps researchers were locating and tagging calling whales, they were also keeping an ear out for 52, Sirovic said.

USA Today
Apr 22, 2016
Mario Molina shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995 for work on chlorofluorocarbons and teaches at the University of California, San Diego. V. Ramanathan discovered the greenhouse effect of halocarbons, and is professor of atmospheric and climate science at UC San Diego. Durwood Zaelke is president of the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development.

Physics Today
Apr 22, 2016
Marcia McNutt has rubbed shoulders with President Obama, Chinese premier Li Keqiang, and Pope Francis. She has also undergone explosives training with the US Navy SEALs, barrel raced on her Arabian horse, and raised three daughters. Currently editor-in-chief of Science, she will leave on 1 July to start a six-year term at the helm of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). For many years McNutt followed a typical academic career. After earning her bachelor's degree at Colorado College in 1973 and her PhD at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography five years later, she settled into academic life. But in 1997 she left her tenured position at MIT to brave a new career. The move has paid off, as she has progressed from one prestigious science leadership role to the next.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Apr 22, 2016

Vice
Apr 22, 2016
With an estimated 1.7 million new cancer diagnoses every year in the US, and outbreaks of malaria, Ebola and Zika rocking populations around the world, scientists are on a constant search for new compounds that might kill the cancer cells and microbes that threaten human life. Over the past two decades, they've turned increasingly to one important place: coral reefs. Compounds derived from the ocean are approximately seven times more likely to make it into drug form [than compounds from land], William Gerwick, professor of oceanography and pharmaceutical sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, told VICE. The staggering number and range of species in the ocean is one reason for this success, but what makes marine compounds particularly effective for drug development is how they've evolved. "Part of why coral reefs have such potential is because all of that diversity makes for tough competition," David Kline, a coral reef researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told VICE.

KQED
Apr 21, 2016
A growing network of cameras trained on the forested mountains around Lake Tahoe is changing the way crews fight Western wildfires by allowing early detection that triggers quicker, cheaper, more tactical suppression than traditional war-like operations, experts said Wednesday. Frank Vernon, a research geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, began developing the “virtual fire lookout towers” in 2002 when he and others built a large-scale, wireless network in Southern California.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Apr 19, 2016