Scripps in the News

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Yahoo News
Jan 20, 2015

Researchers are tuning in to urban seismic noise, the man-made signals from human activity, to view geologic structures and track the rhythms of cities. Until now, scientists often tossed away data containing the pesky vibrations created as humans scurry from one place to another. Urban seismic noise often plagues scientists who study earthquakes by overwhelming seismometers, the instruments that detect earthquakes. Because of this interference, these detectors are typically placed far from airports, train tracks and freeways in order to avoid the urban buzz. "For seismologists, the focus was, 'If a train is passing, let's make sure we can remove those trains,'" said Nima Riahi, a researcher and seismologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


National Geographic: Voices
Jan 20, 2015

Imagine if each tap that delivered water from the Colorado River – whether to a farm, a factory, or a home – suddenly went dry for a year. What would happen to the West’s economy? That’s pretty much the question a team of researchers at Arizona State University set out to answer – and the results are startling. The region would lose $1.4 trillion – that’s trillion, with a “t” – in economic activity, along with 16 million jobs. Since 2000, Lake Mead’s level has dropped more than 100 feet. From nearly full 14 years ago, the reservoir is now at 41% of capacity. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego,  have calculated that without aggressive conservation efforts there’s a 50-50 chance that Lake Mead could reach “dead pool,” essentially an unusable state, by 2036.


Los Angeles Times
Jan 19, 2015

Powerful storms known as atmospheric rivers, ribbons of water vapor that extend for thousands of miles, pulling moisture from the tropics and delivering it to the West Coast, have broken 40% of California droughts since 1950, recent research shows. "These atmospheric rivers — their absence or their presence — really determine whether California is in drought or not and whether floods are going to occur," said F. Martin Ralph, a research meteorologist who directs the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


KPBS
Jan 19, 2015

With chalk in their hands, dozens of volunteers fanned out along the beach near the roller coaster at Belmont Park in Mission Bay on Monday to draw lines and attention to the impact of sea level rise. After New York’s HighWaterLine art project, San Diego’s Mission Beach was one of several communities across the country holding similar events. San Francisco, New York and Miami also used art to address climate change. Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego predict a combination of high tides and big storms will cause massive flooding within the next 35 years. That's why volunteers with SanDiego350 were using chalk along the Mission Boulevard sidewalk to illustrate those threats.


KPCC
Jan 19, 2015

“We don’t understand enough about how atmospheric rivers transport water vapor and how the water vapor comes together in them. We also don’t know enough about how aerosols can change the amount of precipitation that can come out of an atmospheric river when it hits shore," said Marty Ralph, a research meteorologist and director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.


New Zealand Herald
Jan 15, 2015

Professor Roemmich, of the University of California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told the Herald he and colleagues had observed an ongoing trend of change in the South Pacific Gyre - a mass of circular currents that rotate anti-clockwise and dominate the circulation of the South Pacific Ocean.


New Scientist
Jan 14, 2015

Could one man succeed in spurring decisive action on global warming? Pope Francis, leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics, plans to release a ground-breaking appeal to combat climate change, in a major document called an encyclical. Its message will be spread to congregations around the world by Catholic clergy, mobilising grassroots pressure for action ahead of the key UN climate summit in December in Paris. The most likely thrust of the pope's appeal will be that failure to combat climate change will condemn the world's poorest people to disproportionate harm. "The sad part is that the poorest three billion will be the worst affected by the impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise and drought, but have had least to do with causing it," says Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a climatologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and a scientific adviser to the Vatican on the encyclical.


Nature
Jan 14, 2015

“The worst thing that can happen to science is to get mixed up in politics,” says Francisco Valero, a retired climate scientist who was at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and led the satellite’s original Earth-science team. “That is what happened to us.


LiveScience
Jan 14, 2015

Researchers are tuning in to urban seismic noise, the man-made signals from human activity, to view geologic structures and track the rhythms of cities.
Until now, scientists often tossed away data containing the pesky vibrations created as humans scurry from one place to another. Urban seismic noise often plagues scientists who study earthquakes by overwhelming seismometers, the instruments that detect earthquakes. Because of this interference, these detectors are typically placed far from airports, train tracks and freeways in order to avoid the urban buzz. "For seismologists, the focus was, 'If a train is passing, let's make sure we can remove those trains,'" said Nima Riahi, a researcher and seismologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


Nature
Jan 14, 2015

Other researchers are even less sympathetic to Duarte's thesis. One is atmospheric physicist Ralph Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, whose work is criticized in the paper. In 2010, Keeling and his co-authors suggested that in the future the problem of low oxygen levels in water, now seen in 'dead zones' off many coasts, could spread on a global scale3. Duarte and his team do not present evidence to the contrary, but they suggest that it is wrong to call this a 'calamity'.

But Keeling, who leads programmes on atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, says that his paper did not use the term calamity. Instead, it called the issue “a potentially serious consequence of global warming”.

Duarte's paper “is kind of committing the same sin it’s railing against in the casting of this as a series of calamities”, says Keeling. “The literature doesn’t call it calamites. That’s their own hyperbolic language.”