Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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San Diego 6
Sep 09, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 18px; orphans: auto; text-align: left; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&ldquo;The diversity of habitat types we saw within this one </span><span style="font-size: medium;">seep</span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 18px; orphans: auto; text-align: left; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> was really striking,&rdquo; said Ben Grupe, a Scripps alumnus who led the study. &ldquo;Some areas featured dense but patchy clam beds, others had sediments covered with bacterial mats, while others had snails and glass sponges living on large carbonate rocks.&rdquo;</span></p>

CBS 8
Sep 09, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 15.3000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 22.9500007629395px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography have released video of some unique deep sea creatures living off the coast of Del Ma</span></p>

The Straits Times
Sep 06, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: SelaneTen, Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; font-size: 19px; line-height: 27.142858505249px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">She studied insect ecology at Oxford University. She met Dr Ralph Lewin, a professor of marine microbiology at an international conference in 1968 and they married a year later. She joined him at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California, San Diego, and started working on marine insects.</span></p>

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Sep 03, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-family: Georgia, serif; font-size: 17.007999420166px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: 0.255119979381561px; line-height: 27.2127990722656px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">But Brice Semmens, an assistant professor in the marine biology research division at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, said sportfishing generally does not affect populations of wild fish nearly as much as commercial fishing.</span></p>

Discovery News
Sep 02, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">In its latest update, the World Meteorological Organization &mdash; the UN&rsquo;s authoritative body for studying weather and ocean-atmosphere interaction &mdash; says the 2015-2016 El Ni&ntilde;o event is the strongest since 1997-1998 and is potentially among the four strongest events since 1950. In case you&rsquo;re still unclear on the concept, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego explains that El Ni&ntilde;o is a temporary change in the climate of the Pacific ocean, in the region around the equator, which becomes slightly warmer. Normally, east-to-west winds push warm water westward and pull up colder deep water to replace it in the east, moderating ocean temperatures.</span></p>

KPBS
Sep 02, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Many Americans are missing out on the nutritional benefits of fish and shellfish because they are falling short of weekly recommendations for seafood servings, according to USDA researchers. Theresa Sinicrope Talley, California Sea Grant Extension specialist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, said many Americans prefer imported fish like tuna, salmon and shrimp. She said 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat is imported. &quot;It&#39;s not a problem,&quot; Talley told KPBS Midday Edition </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1063029193" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">on Wednesday</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">. &quot;I think it would be better to include more smaller fish. They tend to be a little more efficient because you get more energy per unit.&quot;</span></p>

10 News
Aug 31, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">There was an eerie calm as a hammerhead shark lapped two kayak fishermen </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1646379254" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">on Saturday</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> just off La Jolla. Andrew Nosal, a marine biologist with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, said they could be getting cozy near our coast because the warm water is moving them up from Mexico. He said they do not often attack, but they can. &quot;You figure any large shark with a large mouth is potentially dangerous,&quot; Nosal said.</span></p>

10 News
Aug 31, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">You don&rsquo;t have to look at computer weather models to verify El Ni&ntilde;o continues to develop out in the Pacific Ocean. Sea surface temperatures continue to show warming, in red and yellow along the coast. &ldquo;The models forecasted for this to carry on through the winter,&rdquo; said Tim Barnett, climatologist from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.</span><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" /> &nbsp;</p>

Los Angeles Times
Aug 29, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">San Diego lifeguards ordered a stretch of beach in La Jolla closed </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_514201526" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Saturday</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">afternoon</span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> after a confirmed sighting of an 8- to 10-foot hammerhead shark. The closure, ordered at </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_514201527" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">1 p.m.</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">, will remain in place for at least 24 hours from La Jolla Cove to Scripps Pier, authorities said. No one was injured but the shark seemed to be acting aggressively toward a group of kayakers, authorities said. Lifeguards contacted Andy Nosal, marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, who confirmed that &quot;the size, species and behavior of the shark warranted the closure.&quot;&nbsp;</span><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" /> &nbsp;</p>

USC News
Aug 27, 2015
<p>If there&rsquo;s one message to take away from Racing Extinction, the new environmental documentary from Academy Award-winning director Louie Psihoyos (The Cove), it&rsquo;s this: If we don&rsquo;t act to stop climate change now, humanity won&rsquo;t go out with a bang but more likely with a whimper. Hollywood, Health &amp; Society, a program of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism&rsquo;s Norman Lear Center, presented a preview of the documentary on Aug. 24, followed by a panel discussion and Q&amp;A that featured Margaret Leinen, director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, along with others.&nbsp;</p>