Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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The San Diego Union-Tribune
Apr 09, 2016
When guests visit Birch Aquarium at Scripps on Sunday, they’ll wander among the tanks and pools to the strains of experimental music, including pieces inspired by the ocean and improvised to the movement of sharks. Among the otherworldly tunes featured at the fourth annual “Springfest: IMMERSION” will be the world premiere of a new chamber jazz project from local composer Joe Garrison, with award-winning flutist Lori Bell.

San Luis Obispo Tribune
Apr 02, 2016
As most San Luis Obispo County surfers or fishers will tell you, this year has been one of the most energetic since the last very strong El Niño event in 1997-98. In fact, their observations are verified by the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant’s waverider buoy database, which can be found at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

KPCC
Mar 31, 2016
It's the last day of March, which means it's the end of the six-month period during which Southern California receives most of its rain. So, during this El Niño winter, how much rain did the region get? Not much at all. 58.7% of a normal winter’s accumulation. A number close to 100 would mean it had been a typical year for precipitation—and this year the L.A. area is still about 40 percentage points below that. With just a few hours left in March, it will be impossible to make that up. "The L.A. Basin has been incredibly dry this year," said David Pierce of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who created the rain metric used by KPCC.

Bloomberg
Mar 31, 2016
Spring is in the air, but what is it? The blossoms blossoming? The vernal equinox? Yes to both, and one more: It's how a young American chemist named Charles David Keeling stumbled upon proof of a climate problem way back in 1959. Here's how he made his astonishing discovery—and why the Bloomberg Carbon Clock just started running backwards. By 1956, he had brought his experiment to Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, where he would work until his death in 2005. The possibility that industrial CO2 emissions were warming the world was a viable but untested idea at the time. Keeling faced a phenomenal opportunity: to set up a monitoring station 11,135 feet up the side of a mountain, in the middle of the ocean, where his machine could sniff the clear air. "He got brought down to Scripps to run this enormous program at a very young age," Ralph Keeling, Dave Keeling's son and a prominent Scripps geochemist, said in an interview late last year.

Los Angeles Times
Mar 31, 2016
As climate change has heightened concerns about the global decline of mangroves, a study released this week found that such ecosystems along the desert coast of Baja California may be more important than previously thought for keeping heat-trapping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Researchers at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography discovered that despite their short and stunted appearance, mangroves in these desert locations had surprisingly high rates of sequestering carbon underground. In some cases, the ability was several times greater than that of lush mangroves in tropical locations. "Desert mangroves specifically in Mexico, which are much smaller and cover a very small total land area, sequester comparable amounts of carbon to tropical mangroves in tropical rainforests," said Paula Ezcurra, lead author of the report.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Mar 29, 2016
As climate change has heightened concerns about the global decline of mangroves, a new study found that such ecosystems along the desert coast of Baja California may be more important than previously thought for keeping heat-trapping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Researchers at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography discovered that despite their short and stunted appearance, mangroves in these desert locations had surprisingly high rates of sequestering carbon underground.

Climate Central
Mar 28, 2016
Squat mangrove forests that seem at first blush to simply eke by along the coasts of Baja California are sitting on a big secret — one with sweeping implications in an era of accelerating climate change. Despite their diminutive appearance, scientists discovered that these mucky coastal ecosystems store huge amounts of carbon, helping to slow global warming. The peninsula’s low-growing mangrove forests harbor at least as much carbon as towering mangrove forests found elsewhere, scientists led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego reported Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences — and more carbon for every acre than many of the world’s forests. "These forests have been growing on top of themselves for more than 2,000 years,” said Octavio Aburto-Oropeza, an assistant professor at Scripps whose lab led the research.