Scripps in the News

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NBC News
Jan 28, 2015

As doctors and health specialists urge us to eat more fish, environmentalists are warning that we may end up harvesting our favorite sea life to the brink and beyond. Some of the most popular varieties have already begun to decline precipitously, experts say. And that's with Americans eating less than half of what the U.S. government's dietary guidelines suggest. While fish farming might seem to offer the perfect solution to the overharvesting problem, in its current state, it's deeply flawed from a sustainability standpoint, says Theresa Sinicrope Talley, a coastal specialist with the California Sea Grant Extension Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. That's due to the food most fish farmers are feeding their stock: other fish.


takepart.com
Jan 27, 2015

“The wavelength between crests is about 100 miles, and they’re moving at jogging speed,” said Robert Pinkel, professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. “Imagine looking at the rolling hills of Kentucky and suddenly noticing that they’re all kind of jogging towards each other, well, if you put on magic glasses and looked at the ocean, that’s what you’d see.”


The Conversation
Jan 23, 2015

By: Andrew Frederick Johnson, Postdoctoral Researcher of Marine Biology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. We know that fishing has significant impacts on our oceans and the animals that live in them. Effects can range from habitat modification caused by bottom trawls, stock declines from overfishing or subtler consequences such as shifts in the structure and functioning of marine food webs. Although such effects are ubiquitous and happen across many different marine systems, the difficulty of producing a standardized way of measuring them has often stymied scientists. Recently a team from the Gulf of California Marine Program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography decided to tackle this problem of gauging health in marine systems. Their goal was to develop a simple model that could easily evaluate the health of reefs, and in turn guide decisions on the potential effects of ocean protection.


CBS 8
Jan 23, 2015

Why have the sunsets in San Diego been so extraordinary lately? We talked to a professor with Scripps Institution of Oceanography who says the beautiful colors are the result of Santa Ana conditions. The wind is blowing offshore, pushing particles of dust and pollution over the ocean. "Those will scatter away the bluer wavelengths of light, so that only the red light comes through," Scripps Institution of Oceanography Dr. Joel Norris said.
 


Fondriest Environmental
Jan 23, 2015

Scientists from the U.S., Australia and Canada are teaming up in two research vessels equipped with a slew of monitoring tech that will track waves originating off undersea mountains in the area that flow all the way to New Zealand. “The Tasman Sea appears to be a magic spot, or an ideal lab, for studying accelerated ocean mixing and deep ocean turbulence,” said Rob Pinkel, professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and a principal investigator on the project.
 


Associated Press
Jan 22, 2015

Richard Somerville, a member of the Bulletin's board who is a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, said the trend in heat-trapping emissions from the burning of fossil fuels will "lead to major climatic disruption globally. The urgency has nothing to do with politics or ideology. It arises from the laws of physics and biology and chemistry. These laws are non-negotiable."


Space Daily
Jan 21, 2015

CalWater 2015 is an interagency, interdisciplinary field campaign starting January 14, 2015. CalWater 2015 will entail four research aircraft flying through major storms while a ship outfitted with additional instruments cruises below. The research team includes scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, NOAA, and NASA and uses resources from the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility--a national scientific user facility. "After several years in the making by an interdisciplinary science team, and through support from multiple agencies, the CalWater 2015 field campaign is set to observe the key conditions offshore and over California like has never been possible before," said Scripps climate researcher Marty Ralph, a CalWater lead investigator.


Nature World Report
Jan 21, 2015

Bone worms are called ‘zombie worms’ for a good reason: They don’t have mouths or guts. Yet, that doesn’t prevent them from eating whale carcasses and otherwise proliferating deep in the ocean and puzzling scientists. Now, researchers have just found a new male species that can grow to the same size as females and display very uncanny characteristics during mating. The findings about the male bone worms were detailed in a study published in the December issue of Current Biology. Author Greg Rouse, a marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, wrote that worm’s entire body “has evolved as a tool for mating, and that’s why we named it Osedax priapus, the mythological god of fertility.”


Nature
Jan 20, 2015

 “When we have too many atmospheric rivers, floods can occur, and when we don’t have enough we gradually fall into drought,” says Marty Ralph, a meteorologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and a leader of the field campaign.

“When we have too many atmospheric rivers, floods can occur, and when we don’t have enough we gradually fall into drought,” says Marty Ralph, a meteorologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and a leader of the field campaign.


Yahoo News
Jan 20, 2015

Researchers are tuning in to urban seismic noise, the man-made signals from human activity, to view geologic structures and track the rhythms of cities. Until now, scientists often tossed away data containing the pesky vibrations created as humans scurry from one place to another. Urban seismic noise often plagues scientists who study earthquakes by overwhelming seismometers, the instruments that detect earthquakes. Because of this interference, these detectors are typically placed far from airports, train tracks and freeways in order to avoid the urban buzz. "For seismologists, the focus was, 'If a train is passing, let's make sure we can remove those trains,'" said Nima Riahi, a researcher and seismologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.