Scripps in the News

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FOX Business: Lou Dobbs Tonight
Oct 08, 2014

California Farm Bureau Federation President Paul Wenger and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego’s Dr. Daniel Cayan on the drought in California.


Reporting Climate Science
Oct 08, 2014

Scientists and technicians deploy the first of two Deep Argo floats from RV Tangaroa in June 2014 over the 5.5km deep abyssal plain east of New Zealand, a deep ocean region where bottom waters that spread north after sinking near Antarctica have exhibited significant warming over recent decades. These floats, designed and built at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, are capable of profiling to depths of 6 km, allowing sampling of almost all of the ocean volume.


University Herald
Oct 08, 2014

"Recent refinement to the analysis has given greater certainty about when the aircraft turned," the ATSB wrote in a statement on their website Wednesday. "The underwater search should be prioritized further south." One likely culprit for why there are no traces of the plane or its passengers is how profoundly little of the ocean floor mankind has actually found. "We've seen so little, we've explored and sampled so little of the sea floor," Dr. Lisa Levin, a professor and researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, told CNN.


U-T San Diego
Oct 08, 2014

And on Thursday Oct. 9, the author of such best-sellers as “In Defense of Food” and “Cooked” comes to San Diego to receive the Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s 2014 Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest.


CNN
Oct 07, 2014

In preparation for the search of Flight 370, ships surveyed tens of thousands of square kilometers of the bottom of the ocean where the plane is believed to have gone down. Dr. Jules Jaffe and Dr. Lisa Levin, both professors and researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, say it is important to continue to explore and understand the deep ocean, as our knowledge and stewardship for the deep ocean is critical to the health of the planet and human well-being.


On Earth
Oct 06, 2014

Research published Sunday concluded that the upper 2,300 feet of the Southern Hemisphere’s oceans may have warmed twice as quickly after 1970 than had previously been thought. “We continue to be stunned at how rapidly the ocean is warming,” said Sarah Gille, a Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego professor. Sunday’s papers joined more than 1,000 others published so far that have used Argo float data to improve science’s understanding of waterways that are climatically influential but difficult to measure manually. “This research covers a very broad range of topics including ocean circulation, water mass formation and spreading, mesoscale eddies, interannual variability such as El Niño, decadal variability, and multi-decadal climate change,” said Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor Dean Roemmich.


KQED
Oct 06, 2014

Research published Sunday concluded that the upper 2,300 feet of the Southern Hemisphere’s oceans may have warmed twice as quickly after 1970 than had previously been thought.  “We continue to be stunned at how rapidly the ocean is warming,” said Sarah Gille, a professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. “Even if we stopped all greenhouse gas emissions today, we’d still have an ocean that is warmer than the ocean of 1950, and that heat commits us to a warmer climate,” Gille said.


Los Angeles Times
Oct 04, 2014

Scientists have created the highest resolution map yet of the ocean floor, revealing thousands of underwater mountains and extinct volcanoes that were previously unknown. In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers say the new map is at least twice as accurate as the previous version assembled nearly 20 years ago even though it can only resolve features that are a mile high and bigger. "You might think, that's not so much better, but instead of seeing 5,000 old volcanoes down there, now we can see 10,000," said David Sandwell, a geophysics professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego who led the study.


Scientific American
Oct 03, 2014

David Sandwell, a geophysicist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and his colleagues used that phenomenon to produce these startlingly detailed charts of the deep, even features buried under mile-thick sediment layers.


BBC
Oct 02, 2014

Dave Sandwell and colleagues used radar satellites to discern the mountains' presence under water and report their findings in Science Magazine.