Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
NOTE: Links to external sites may unexpectedly change or be removed by the owner. Every attempt will be made to keep links to media outlets from this page accurate.


EOS
Aug 10, 2016
Seven Arctic researchers shared their unconventional methods for communicating scientific developments and discoveries to the public at a workshop held simultaneously with the American Geophysical Union’s 2015 Fall Meeting. The event—Revealing the New Arctic: A Climate Change Communication Workshop—not only explored creative approaches to communicating Arctic change but also revealed scientists’ personal reasons for engaging in outreach. Till Wagner (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego) presented his novel approach to exhibiting scaled frozen replicas of sea ice floes for museum audiences. The replicas were created from three-dimensional lidar scans taken from the field.

ABC News
Aug 10, 2016
A team of researchers examining the foraging behavior of 10 whales in the Gulf of Maine found that some of these 40-ton cetaceans descended more slowly in the presence of ships, giving them less time to find the food they'd normally consume. The whales also conducted fewer side-roll maneuvers — a technique they use to feed on a type of fish known as a sand lance that's found just above the sea floor. Several researchers who did not participate in the study praised the finding and said it adds to evidence about the harmful role ships pose to whales.But John Hildebrand, an expert on marine mammals and ocean acoustics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, dismissed the finding. Calling the paper's conclusion wrong, Hildebrand said the researchers confused the "flow noise" of the whale moving with ship noise and thus misinterpreted the data — a charge the paper's authors dispute.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Aug 10, 2016
Two technologies from UC San Diego – a saliva diagnostics sensor and foam that can generate power – have been selected for up to $6 million in funding by local start-up investor NextWave Venture Partners. The deals highlight NextWave’s business model of licensing promising technologies from universities and research institutes. It has named its latest investments MouthSense and SmartFoam. Founded in 2010, NextWave raised $20 million in its initial fund, with Quad Geometrics its top investment. Spun out of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Quad Geometrics measures sea-floor gravity and surface elevation changes for the offshore oil drilling industry. 

Marine Technology News
Aug 08, 2016
The best way to gain knowledge of the fundamental process of crustal formation, of course, would be to look at the Moho directly. In 1957, Harry Hess was talking with a colleague, Walter Munk of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who idly suggested enlisting a team of scientists to drill a hole to the Moho through the seafloor, since Earth’s crust is much thinner under the oceans than it is beneath continents. The pair would propose the idea to the American Miscellaneous Society, a group of scientists that entertained, as its name suggests, out-of-the-box ideas. The idea garnered support in the scientific community. But more important, it gained political support as a way to seed new deep-ocean-drilling technology that the Soviets seemed to be trying to develop, too. Thus Project Mohole was launched—alongside the contemporaneous race to the moon.

NSF Science 360
Aug 04, 2016
A new microscopic imaging system is revealing a never-before-seen view of the underwater world. Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, have designed and built a diver-operated underwater microscope to study millimeter-scale processes as they occur naturally on the seafloor.

KESQ
Aug 02, 2016
"For the San Jacinto fault we've had many magnitude-5 earthquakes since 2000. Just a little ways over here maybe 10 miles away. So this is a very good place to make these types of measurements. It's close, the seismic waves get here first, before it gets into the valley," said Frank Vernon, a research seismologist at UCSD.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Aug 02, 2016
The pier is a cherished icon not only for UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, but also for the greater San Diego community. For many residents, the pier is as familiar a sight as the San Diego-Coronado Bridge and Hotel del Coronado.

Phys.org
Aug 01, 2016
On a ship off the coast of Bermuda, Frederik Simons, an associate professor of geosciences at Princeton University, fastens a rope around a six-foot-tall white cylinder affixed with solar panels and various wires suspended in a metal frame. As everyone scrambles into position, a crane slowly raises the device and prepares to lower it into the ocean. After three years of work on design modifications and fine-tuning, the researchers are preparing to test the apparatus for the first time. The instrument, named Son-O-Mermaid, will detect and record waves, but not the kind that are rolling under the research vessel and making Simons seasick. While on sabbatical at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, Nolet met a colleague who was measuring sound waves in the ocean. Among the whale songs and passing freighters, Nolet detected the signal of an earthquake that came all the way from Alaska.

UPI
Jul 28, 2016
Scientists have identified a rare new species of whale in the North Pacific Ocean. The whale looks similar to the common Baird's beaked whale, but is slightly smaller and darker. Even Japanese whalers -- who call the species "karasu," Japanese for raven -- rarely see the whale. Scientists from a variety of universities, as well as the NOAA and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, conducted DNA analysis to confirm the species' uniqueness. The whale's discovery was announced in a new paper, published this week in the journal Marine Mammal Science.

EOS
Jul 28, 2016
Volcanologist Peter Barry spent years in the Great Rift Valley of Tanzania as a graduate student studying the noble gases released at hot springs, asking broad scientific questions about the region’s nearby volcanoes. A team led by Barry recently found evidence for unusually rich helium deposits across the Rift Valley. One apparent reservoir of the gas offers the unheard-of helium concentration of more than 10% by volume. The discoveries in Tanzania aren’t expected to make a big difference to the world reserves. The estimated 1.53 billion cubic meters of helium gas there would meet only about 9 years of global helium demand, according to Robert Jolley, field manager at the U.S. Federal Helium Reserve in Amarillo, Texas. Rather, “it is the high helium concentrations [that] are significant, as opposed to the total amount of gas, which is not huge compared to other helium-producing regions,” said David Hilton, an isotope geochemist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego in Calif.