Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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KPBS
Jan 25, 2016
Sea cliffs have crumbled and several beaches in North County have eroded down to pebbles by high tides and El Niño storms. This winter may reveal how expensive it would be to preserve San Diego beaches as sea levels rise. Robert Guza, professor of oceanography at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, said places that flood intermittently now could find themselves flooded on a daily basis in the long term. He said this winter’s king tides and El Niño storms will give us a glimpse into the future of sea level rise.

Smithsonian.com
Jan 25, 2016
Don't worry: When the drillers eventually pierce the mantle, hot molten rock won’t surge up the hole and spill onto the seafloor in a volcanic eruption. Although mantle rocks do flow, they do so at a speed akin to the growth rate of a fingernail, says Holly Given, a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego.

KPBS
Jan 22, 2016
“If we actually get folks taking pictures from the same locations, pointed in the same direction, repeatedly — so say, every day or every week — that’s actually the most valuable data for us,” said Sarah Giddings, a researcher and professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

KPBS
Jan 21, 2016
San Diego has stayed pretty dry after an early burst of El Niño-driven storms drenched Southern California in early January. But recent storms in Northern California have kept rain and snow levels climbing steadily. "Northern California has been getting some precipitation recently, which is good," said David Pierce, a climate researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego who helped compile data for the KPBS Drought Tracker.

San Diego Magazine
Jan 21, 2016
I meet fascinating people on the Mesa and want to learn who they are, apart from the science. So the pressure has been mounting as I put off writing about our colorful conversation, worried I would not do his story justice. Who is this intriguing mystery man I speak of? None other than the quirky yet legendary B. Greg Mitchell. Greg is an explorer, who travels the world studying algae. Trips to Antarctica and the Arctic and Central Pacific are the norm for this globetrotter and he has been known to practice his yoga headstand on a meter of Arctic sea ice. His current work is the study of microalgae photosynthesis from laboratory, to commercial, to global ocean scales. At the ripe age of 13 he set out to become a Marine Biologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, where he could surf daily at Black’s.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Jan 21, 2016
A storm with 80 mph winds once forced Hubert Staudigel to stay in his tent for eight straight days during a research expedition to Mount Erebus, an active volcano on that frigid continent. “We couldn’t create heat because it would have melted ice on the tent, causing it to rain inside,” said Staudigel, a geophysicist at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. In the past, the public rarely heard about the triumphs and travails of Scripps’ scientists, who work everywhere from Earth’s two poles to the deserts of Africa to the deepest reaches of the Pacific. That’s about to change. Scripps operates the nearby Birch Aquarium, which is undergoing a major makeover designed to give the institution the ability to broadly showcase its field research, including work conducted on its research ships.

Los Angeles Times
Jan 20, 2016
2015 was Earth's hottest year on record, and it appears the planet is still getting hotter. Barely three weeks into the new year, climate researchers from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are already predicting that the average surface temperature around the planet is likely to be higher in 2016 than it was in 2015. That would mark the first time the average global temperature reached record-breaking heights for three consecutive years. While most climatologists agree that more record-breaking years are sure to come, not all of them expect 2016 to be warmer than 2015. Tim Barnett, a marine physicist with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, said his models predicted “a whopping cold event in the second half of 2016 that would temper or cancel out some of the effects of the El Niño in the first months of the year.”

San Diego Reader
Jan 20, 2016
Every day under the Scripps pier in La Jolla, two cameras capture thousands of images of the weird and wonderful organisms called plankton.

Associated Press
Jan 19, 2016
The amount of man-made heat energy absorbed by the seas has doubled since 1997, a new study says. Scientists have long known that more than 90 percent of the heat energy from man-made global warming goes into the world's oceans instead of the ground. And they've seen ocean heat content rise in recent years. Jeff Severinghaus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego praised the study, saying it "provides real, hard evidence that humans are dramatically heating the planet."

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Jan 18, 2016
The Birch Aquarium in La Jolla is exhibiting a collection of photos taken by Octavio Aburto, a marine ecologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. The images focus on Aburto's research in Mexican waters, particularly the Gulf of California. Aburto has spent a lot of time studying and photographing marine life in Cabo Pulmo, a small village northeast of Cabo San Lucas. He plans to return to Cabo Pulmo on a research trip later this year.