Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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KPBS
Mar 21, 2017
A Tuesday morning update from the KPBS Drought Tracker puts California's statewide rainfall at 167 percent of normal for the entire wet season. It'll need to reach 184 to break the record set on April 1st, 1983. "We're near the record that was set in '82-'83 at this time of year," said Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego climate researcher David Pierce, who helped compile data for the KPBS Drought Tracker. "It remains to be seen whether we break that record or not," he said.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Mar 16, 2017
Trump’s budget released Thursday slashes funding for marine and climate change research — two things San Diego prides itself on.

NBC 7 San Diego
Mar 10, 2017
There is a room in La Jolla few people ever get a chance to see. It's not open to the public, which means the two million dead fish carefully stored inside are mostly for an audience of two. Ben Frable is the collection's manager. Dr. Phil Hastings is the currator of the marine invertebrate collection at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. "It's really quite a fascinating job," said Hastings. "I have one of the best jobs in the world.”

KPBS
Mar 10, 2017
In a break from the stormy weather we've been seeing lately, San Diego is currently back to being sunny and warm. But an update from the KPBS Drought Tracker shows this wet season is still shaping up to be a record-breaker for California. "The snowpack is getting very close to 200 percent of normal for the central and southern Sierra," said Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego climate researcher David Pierce, who helped compile this data.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Mar 10, 2017
UC San Diego may accelerate plans to preserve its climate data due to growing concerns among faculty members that the Trump administration could interfere with their work.

Los Angeles Times
Mar 09, 2017
The discovery of missing links between earthquake faults shows how a magnitude 7.4 earthquake could rupture in the same temblor underneath Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties, a new study finds. But to get to a 7.4, the earthquake would not only have to again rupture the Newport-Inglewood fault in Los Angeles and Orange counties. The temblor would also have to jolt the adjacent Rose Canyon fault system, which runs all the way through downtown San Diego and hasn’t ruptured since roughly 1650. “These two fault zones are actually one continuous fault zone,” said Valerie Sahakian, the study’s lead author, who wrote it while working on her doctorate at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.