Scripps in the News

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Los Angeles Times
Aug 24, 2016
Bob Guza has the best job in California. Guza retired in 2012, but after a month off, the professor emeritus couldn't think of anything better to do with his time, so he went back to work. “I’m a lucky guy,” says the researcher at UC San Diego’s Scripps Center for Coastal Studies. I met Guza at the Scripps Pier, where his office hovers over the beach. Guza calls his operation the beach and sand lab, and he and his team of seven study the movement of sand along the California coast. Two things are happening simultaneously along the coast, Guza explained, and it's critical that we know more about each of them. One is beach erosion, the other is sea level rise. "If we do nothing, absolutely nothing, I'd say in 50 years we're going to have very few beaches left.”

CW6
Aug 24, 2016
A local researcher says if something isn’t done, San Diego’s beaches could be at risk of disappearing. Scripps Institution of Oceanography UC San Diego Professor Emeritus Bob Guza says, “Sand is like gold and there is a sand shortage in Southern California.” He and his research group have been studying ocean patterns, waves and beaches. And what they’ve noticed is there is more beach erosion and rising sea levels. “Our beaches are going to become narrow, in some places there won’t be any beaches. The water will be right up to the coast highway.” Professor Guza says while we can’t stop nature there is a way to help it. “If we do nothing and by nothing we don’t put sand on beaches and we don’t unclog, rivers, I’d say in 75 years we might see a big sea level rise.”

Los Angeles Times
Aug 23, 2016
As a series of marine heat waves linked to climate change has thrown ocean ecosystems out of whack from Australia to the coast of California, a cooling trend called La Niña has given scientists hope that water temperatures could come back into balance. But so far, the cooling weather pattern — predicted to follow as a result of last winter’s El Niño — remains squeezed by warmer ocean temperatures along a narrow stretch of the Earth’s equator. That might be good news for California's marine life, if not the drought. However, the cooling ocean waters also usually boost nutrient-rich conditions that can help sea life that has been suffering of late, including the kelp forests along San Diego County coast. “La Niña is embedded in this pool of really warm water in the eastern, tropical Pacific,” said Art Miller, head of the ocean and atmosphere section at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. “You can see the cooling right along the equator, but there are these vast spaces of really warm upper-ocean conditions that it’s trying to push its way through.”

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Aug 23, 2016
Leopard sharks that took a hiatus from La Jolla Shores this summer are finally back at the beach now that water temperatures have dropped. The harmless, colorful fish are a popular draw each year for snorkelers, divers and kayakers in the waters off La Jolla. The sharks normally start congregating in June across from The Marine Room restaurant but this year had been missing from their usual haunt. Andy Nosal, a marine biologist with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego who studies shark behavior and ecology, said he doesn’t remember a summer in the past decade in which the sharks were so scarce for so long. “Certainly there were days here and there, even a week here or there, where the sharks were scarce during the summer, but this year it was over two months,” he said.

CBS8
Aug 23, 2016
An iconic San Diego landmark is celebrating a major milestone. The Scripps Pier at Scripps Institution of Oceanography UC San Diego turned 100 and almost every day since it opened, the pier has played an important role for scientists. CBS News 8's Meteorologist Shawn Styles explains how in this Earth 8 report.

San Diego Reader
Aug 22, 2016
After seeing McMillin’s photo, Birch Aquarium co-curator Leslee Matsushige, who has years of experience with “jellies,” identified it as a Phyllorhiza punctata, or an Australian spotted jellyfish. “They are usually seen in San Diego Bay and Mission Bay during this time of year,” said Matsushige. “Not uncommon and they are an invasive species.”

KPBS
Aug 22, 2016
San Diego oceanographers are celebrating an anniversary Monday that was 100 years in the making. Scientists began recording ocean temperatures at the end of the Scripps Pier in La Jolla in August 1916.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Aug 20, 2016
As a series of marine heat waves linked to climate change has thrown ocean ecosystems out of whack from Australia to the coast of California, a cooling trend called La Niña has given scientists hope that water temperatures could come back into balance. But so far, the cooling weather pattern — predicted to follow as a result of last winter’s El Niño — remains squeezed by warmer ocean temperatures along a narrow stretch of Earth’s equator. “La Niña is embedded in this pool of really warm water in the eastern, tropical Pacific,” said Art Miller, head of the ocean and atmosphere section at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. “You can see the cooling right along the equator, but there are these vast spaces of really warm upper-ocean conditions that it’s trying to push its way through.”

Alaska Public Media
Aug 18, 2016
The Homer City Council passed a resolution on August 8, formally requesting changes to U.S. Navy joint training exercises in the Gulf of Alaska. The proposed training area is 24 nautical miles from the Kenai Peninsula shoreline, just south of Prince William Sound and east of Kodiak Island. It covers over fifty nine thousand square miles, an area slightly larger than the state of Georgia. Professor John Hildebrand of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego said that beaked whales appear to be particularly sensitive to sonar. “There was an exercise in the Bahamas around 2000 where the Navy was conducting an exercise in a relatively confined space along a channel. And then you could see the beaked whales strand themselves along the channel pretty much in lock step with position of the sonars,” Hildebrand said.

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Aug 18, 2016
More than 90 percent of seafood consumed in the U.S. is imported from abroad. You can buy freshly caught fish dockside north of Seaport Village every Saturday but your fish sticks and salmon burgers come from the Mediterranean Sea, the western Pacific, Scandinavian fjords and bays and oceans far away.The San Diego Unified Port District is determined to change all that. It’s in the early stages of jumpstarting a vibrant, growing aquaculture industry in San Diego Bay. One of the byproducts of shellfish farming is a clean bay. For example, oysters, mussels and other shellfish absorb copper, originating from antifouling paint, into their shells and thus remove that toxic pollutant. Theresa Talley, a coastal specialist and researcher at the California Sea Grant program at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, said major seafood operations in San Diego Bay are probably not appropriate quite yet. “The water quality isn’t fit for food quality,” she said. Even shooting for success in 50 years is ambitious.