Scripps in the News

Search print, web, television, and radio press clips about Scripps Institution of Oceanography research and people.
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The New York Times dot Earth blog
Oct 22, 2015
On Tuesday, a simple but sobering note predicting an imminent end to measurements of carbon dioxide in air lower than 400 parts per million was posted by the group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography that has been carefully measuring the rising concentration of this greenhouse gas in the atmosphere since 1958.

KPBS
Oct 21, 2015
<p>A new leader has brought his extensive experience in education and science to the Birch Aquarium at Scripps in San Diego, where thousands of students and tourists learn about the wonders of the Southern California ocean every year. Harry Helling, the new executive director of the aquarium, started his work at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego on Oct. 12. Helling is known as an educator, an ecologist and an outreach innovator. He told KPBS Midday Edition Wednesday he plans to engage audiences &quot;well outside the perimeter of Birch itself,&quot; and through art and music to reach new groups. &quot;It&#39;s not just the Birch Aquarium, it is that connection to all of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and UC San Diego,&quot; Helling said. &quot;It&#39;s a window into the world of investigation into the ocean, into the world of how we create new knowledge about the ocean.&quot;</p>

KCET
Oct 21, 2015
<p>The coastal border region is particularly vulnerable to rains. Storms send muck and sewage down canyons, into channels, and finally gets discharged into the Tijuana River and the Pacific Ocean, prompting pollution warnings and beach closures in both countries. Contamination and cross-border pollution has been a fraught topic for years, but never more so than now, ahead of a rainy season in which a historically powerful El Ni&ntilde;o appears imminent. Sarah Giddings, a researcher with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is a project leader for CSIDE, the Cross Surfzone/Inner-shelf Dye Exchange, which is using bright pink fluorescent dye to track wave dynamics and water movement from the estuary&#39;s mouth up the California coast. The team hopes that the experiment, which wrapped up last week, will provide more insight into the path contaminants take as they travel up the coast by providing better ways to model wave and surf dynamics.</p>

Los Angeles Magazine
Oct 20, 2015
<p>With a growing population and warming climate, our water problems won&rsquo;t be solved by one el Ni&ntilde;o. It was the late summer of 1991, and California was deep into one of the worst droughts in its history.Twenty-two years later, we&rsquo;ve been forgetting winter again. Once again relief might be brewing around the equator: El Ni&ntilde;o is back, and it looks like a doozy. &ldquo;Right now it&rsquo;s on track to be as big as the El Ni&ntilde;o of 1997 to 1998, which was the strongest one of the 20th century,&rdquo; says Michael Dettinger, a research hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. February 1998 remains California&rsquo;s wettest on record.</p>

University of California
Oct 19, 2015
<p>California Gov. Jerry Brown, University of California President Janet Napolitano, politicians, industry leaders and UC&rsquo;s top climate experts are descending on San Diego at the end of October with a shared sense of urgency. The goal: to emerge with a practical and scalable blueprint for tackling climate change that can be applied to California and the world. A group of 50 academics and researchers from across UC&rsquo;s 10 campuses are rising to this challenge on behalf of the university and the state. Spearheaded by renowned climate scientist Veerabhadran &quot;Ram&quot; Ramanathan of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, who in 1975 discovered the greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons in the Earth&rsquo;s atmosphere, the group convened over the summer with the aim of settling on a set of actionable solutions for curbing climate change to be presented and refined at the UC Summit on Carbon and Climate Neutrality,October 26&ndash;27 at UC San Diego.</p>

The San Diego Union-Tribune
Oct 13, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-family: Georgia, serif; font-size: 17.007999420166px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: 0.255119979381561px; line-height: 27.2127990722656px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">It is known as the CSIDE project, short for </span><a href="https://scripps.ucsd.edu/projects/cside/" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; font-size: 17.007999420166px; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 117, 207); font-family: Georgia, serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: 0.255119979381561px; line-height: 27.2127990722656px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Cross Surfzone/Inner-shelf Dye Exchange</a><span style="color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-family: Georgia, serif; font-size: 17.007999420166px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: 0.255119979381561px; line-height: 27.2127990722656px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">, and funded by the National Science Foundation. Participating in the project are researchers from the UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Jacobs School of Engineering, as well as the Autonomous University of Baja California, Ensenada-based scientific research institution CICESE, and members of the Tijuana environmental group, Proyecto Fronterizo de Educaci&oacute;n Ambiental.</span></p>

Yahoo News
Oct 13, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">A coalition of scholars across the West is urging the federal government to partner with the National Academy of Sciences to study the future of the Colorado River, including if climate change is leading to reduced stream flow. Twenty-three scholars from Western universities sent a letter Tuesday to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell detailing their request for more scientific research on a host of issues related to the Colorado River. The scholars who signed the letter include Robert Adler of the University of Utah law school; Victor Baker of the hydrology and water resources department at the University of Arizona; and Tim Barnett at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.</span></p>

iBiology
Oct 13, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Every year from June to December, hundreds to thousands of leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) congregate in this one particular spot along the southern California shoreline. Why are they here? Postdoctoral researcher Andrew Nosal of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego answers this question and articulates why we should care.</span></p>

The Conversation
Oct 13, 2015
<p>Our country needs more scientists who are willing and able to step out in the public arena and to weigh in, clearly and strongly &ndash; such as atmospheric physicist <a href="http://www-ramanathan.ucsd.edu/about/">Veerabhadran Ramanathan</a> of UC San Diego, who discovered the greenhouse effect of halocarbons in 1975.</p> <p>Dr Ramanathan is a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences that <a href="http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2015/jun/18/pope-francis-UCSD/">influenced Pope Francis </a>to speak out on global climate change.</p>

10 News
Oct 12, 2015
<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">On a gloomy </span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1751602155" style="border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dashed; border-bottom-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); position: relative; top: -2px; z-index: 0; color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" tabindex="0"><span class="aQJ" style="position: relative; top: 2px; z-index: -1;">Monday</span></span><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> morning at Imperial Beach, there&#39;s something in the water that brings a pop of color. &quot;Really the first thing I thought was, &#39;Is this red tide?&#39;&quot; beachgoer Patrick Haigh said. Scientists from both sides of the border pumped 30 gallons of harmless rhodamine dye into the Tijuana River Estuary. &quot;Basically, we&#39;re tracking the dye and seeing where it goes as it comes out of the estuary,&quot; said Falk Fedderson with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Feddersen hopes it helps them figure out how pollution moves up and down the coast.</span></p>