Scripps in the News

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Associated Press
Jan 22, 2015

Richard Somerville, a member of the Bulletin's board who is a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, said the trend in heat-trapping emissions from the burning of fossil fuels will "lead to major climatic disruption globally. The urgency has nothing to do with politics or ideology. It arises from the laws of physics and biology and chemistry. These laws are non-negotiable."


Nature World Report
Jan 21, 2015

Bone worms are called ‘zombie worms’ for a good reason: They don’t have mouths or guts. Yet, that doesn’t prevent them from eating whale carcasses and otherwise proliferating deep in the ocean and puzzling scientists. Now, researchers have just found a new male species that can grow to the same size as females and display very uncanny characteristics during mating. The findings about the male bone worms were detailed in a study published in the December issue of Current Biology. Author Greg Rouse, a marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, wrote that worm’s entire body “has evolved as a tool for mating, and that’s why we named it Osedax priapus, the mythological god of fertility.”


Space Daily
Jan 21, 2015

CalWater 2015 is an interagency, interdisciplinary field campaign starting January 14, 2015. CalWater 2015 will entail four research aircraft flying through major storms while a ship outfitted with additional instruments cruises below. The research team includes scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, NOAA, and NASA and uses resources from the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility--a national scientific user facility. "After several years in the making by an interdisciplinary science team, and through support from multiple agencies, the CalWater 2015 field campaign is set to observe the key conditions offshore and over California like has never been possible before," said Scripps climate researcher Marty Ralph, a CalWater lead investigator.


Yahoo News
Jan 20, 2015

Researchers are tuning in to urban seismic noise, the man-made signals from human activity, to view geologic structures and track the rhythms of cities. Until now, scientists often tossed away data containing the pesky vibrations created as humans scurry from one place to another. Urban seismic noise often plagues scientists who study earthquakes by overwhelming seismometers, the instruments that detect earthquakes. Because of this interference, these detectors are typically placed far from airports, train tracks and freeways in order to avoid the urban buzz. "For seismologists, the focus was, 'If a train is passing, let's make sure we can remove those trains,'" said Nima Riahi, a researcher and seismologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


Phys.org
Jan 20, 2015

The NISTAR instrument that will fly aboard NOAA's space weather-observing spacecraft called the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), is going to measure the Earth's radiation budget. NASA is flying two Earth science instruments aboard NOAA's DSCOVR spacecraft. One of them is called the National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer or NISTAR. NISTAR was designed and built between 1999 and 2001 by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego who developed the Scripps-NIST advanced radiometer, or Scripps NISTAR instrument.


National Geographic: Voices
Jan 20, 2015

Imagine if each tap that delivered water from the Colorado River – whether to a farm, a factory, or a home – suddenly went dry for a year. What would happen to the West’s economy? That’s pretty much the question a team of researchers at Arizona State University set out to answer – and the results are startling. The region would lose $1.4 trillion – that’s trillion, with a “t” – in economic activity, along with 16 million jobs. Since 2000, Lake Mead’s level has dropped more than 100 feet. From nearly full 14 years ago, the reservoir is now at 41% of capacity. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego,  have calculated that without aggressive conservation efforts there’s a 50-50 chance that Lake Mead could reach “dead pool,” essentially an unusable state, by 2036.


Nature
Jan 20, 2015

 “When we have too many atmospheric rivers, floods can occur, and when we don’t have enough we gradually fall into drought,” says Marty Ralph, a meteorologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and a leader of the field campaign.

“When we have too many atmospheric rivers, floods can occur, and when we don’t have enough we gradually fall into drought,” says Marty Ralph, a meteorologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, and a leader of the field campaign.


Los Angeles Times
Jan 19, 2015

Powerful storms known as atmospheric rivers, ribbons of water vapor that extend for thousands of miles, pulling moisture from the tropics and delivering it to the West Coast, have broken 40% of California droughts since 1950, recent research shows. "These atmospheric rivers — their absence or their presence — really determine whether California is in drought or not and whether floods are going to occur," said F. Martin Ralph, a research meteorologist who directs the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.


KPCC
Jan 19, 2015

“We don’t understand enough about how atmospheric rivers transport water vapor and how the water vapor comes together in them. We also don’t know enough about how aerosols can change the amount of precipitation that can come out of an atmospheric river when it hits shore," said Marty Ralph, a research meteorologist and director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.


KPBS
Jan 19, 2015

With chalk in their hands, dozens of volunteers fanned out along the beach near the roller coaster at Belmont Park in Mission Bay on Monday to draw lines and attention to the impact of sea level rise. After New York’s HighWaterLine art project, San Diego’s Mission Beach was one of several communities across the country holding similar events. San Francisco, New York and Miami also used art to address climate change. Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego predict a combination of high tides and big storms will cause massive flooding within the next 35 years. That's why volunteers with SanDiego350 were using chalk along the Mission Boulevard sidewalk to illustrate those threats.