Monthly Archives: October 2017

Ready….set……

The Sally Ride is steaming north, for the last major “big ship” effort.  We have 6 days on site to recover 61 moorings, and were greeted this morning by news from the Captain to expect 15-19′ seas upon arrival.  No problem!  Or so we hope.  We have an excellent ship, a solid science party, and lots of enthusiasm.  We also have a large map of all our mooring locations (gotta use that onboard poster printer for something), and we’re ready to start crossing them off one by one.

André Palóczy and Kerry Latham eager to start crossing off moorings.

 

More updates tomorrow when hopefully we have good news, and maybe even data, to share. Wish us luck.

 

An Oceano trifecta in X-band vision

The IOP1 asset visualization now includes 3 ships, 3 boats, 2 sets of drifters and x-band radar images! Thanks to Falk Feddersen for hosting the full video of IOP1!

On 15 September the UNOLS vessel trifecta encountered mingling fronts and internal wave packets headed onshore during Oceano surveys. Two-hours of near-surface temperature data trail each vessel. The tightly-packed moorings, soon to be recovered, were in the middle of it all.  Good luck to the mooring recovery teams!

IOP2 fun around Pt Sal

SIO-Whaler Sally Ann on her offshore (west) survey leg passing to the south of Ghost Reef on 10 October. Photo was take by Falk Feddersen from the RV Sounder

 

IOP2 has been a great deal of fun all around sampling both Pt Sal and Oceano with the Sounder, Kalipi and Oceanus.  Speaking of Oceanus, On 14 Oct, Mike Kovatch took some cool photos on of her from east of Pt Sal looking between Lion Rock on the left and Pt Sal on the right as the Oceanus was doing her onshore leg  and making the turn. 

 

We had three great days at Pt Sal and below are some plot of both the first day (9 Oct) and the last day (14 Oct).    On 9 October, Sally Ann and Sounder repeated the survey lines they did for the first IOP.  Survey lines and CTD data is shown beow.  Lots of repeatable frontal structure.

 

What might that frontal structure look like from the surface?  Well it looks like foam scum lines that are filled with algae. The two photos below are from 9 October which had Hs>2 m.   The first photo is looking north at Pt Sal and Lion Rock.  Note the big foam/algae streak (scum line) heading from Pt Sal to the right of Lion Rock.   The scum line can be very dense – even a few inches thick of foam!

Algae scum line coming off of Pt Sal and heading SE indicating the presence of a front where downwelling is occuring.

Close up of massive algae scum line coming off of Pt Sal on 9 October.

 

On IOP2 Day 6, 14 October, we again had 4 vessels doing joint surveys with the APL plane flying IR & visible and helping guide us.  The Sally Ann did a survey box much tighter near the strong bathymetric variations around Pt Sal.    The survey box below started east just offshore and south of Ghost Reef, passed Seal Rock and then Lion Rock, before turning north for a short leg and then offshore again between Pt Sal and Lion/Seal Rocks.

Here are some photos of those features.

A wave breaking at Ghost Reef up close on 15 Oct. The depth goes from 15 m to <4 m very rapidly (Mike Kovatch).

The NPS boat “SandCrab” racing to the south past Ghost reef to recover instruments. They did not stop for tea and biscuits (Mike Kovatch)

Waves breaking on Seal Rock just south of Pt Sal. Drifters recirculated behind this feature (F Feddersen)

All boats passed through many strong frontal features that had more wake, eddy, and recirculation properties than of NLIW.   Notice the repeatable front properties as the Sally Ann drove the box 4 times.

Sun sets on turnaround cruise

The R/V Oceanus offloaded personnel early this morning in Monterey Bay, bringing to a close the ship’s role in the second intensive operating period (IOP). The Oceanus weathered some sizable swells this past week and is currently steaming up to Newport with hopes of dodging another incoming storm in the north. This research vessel never sleeps.

To commemorate the hustle and bustle we have seen aboard these last twelve days, here is a science GIF (the best type of GIF, if you ask me!) from October 6th.

Mooring redeployment at dusk on October 6th aboard the R/V Oceanus

This sequence is from redeploying our second mooring (MS50-T). You can see us standing in a line on the deck of the ship, holding instruments in hand as we wait for the top float to be released overboard.

I have to admit that the feeling of putting those first few moorings back in the water– after an exciting and frenzied 24 hours between recovery and redeployment– was that of pride and relief: pride for how much we had accomplished in a short amount of time, and relief that the instruments were going back into the ocean where they belonged. As engineer Pavan Vutukur said when he saw the mooring returned to the water with numerous of his lab’s GusT instruments attached:

“Now that they’re going back? I feel so much better.”

We look forward to seeing those instruments again at the end of October. But for now, the sun has set on the second IOP aboard the Oceanus.

— Jenessa Duncombe and the R/V Oceanus team

The Kalipi kicks off another week on the water

The Kalipi is back in action starting today. The OSU group recovered the 10-meter temperature string mooring and the ADCP lander this morning. The seas were glassy calm and the instruments were all returned ondeck safely. The recovery could not have gone better. As Jim Lerzcak said when we brought the lander onboard: “There’s nothing like the warm fuzzy feeling when an ADCP comes back pinging.”

The five of us will be running CTD and ADCP surveys for the rest of the week from the Kalipi. Look for us out there, Oceanus, Sounder, and Sally Ann!

— Jenessa Duncombe and the Kalipi team

Jim Lerczak showing excellent

cotter-pin-removal form

Hoisting a lander onboard:

85% winch and 15% muscle

All smiles after a successful recovery

(from left to right: Jack McSweeney,

Dean Henze, Taylor Eaton,

Jim Lerczak)

scripps oceanography uc san diego