Category Archives: Sproul

Sproul Pt. Sal survey

Since the first Intensive Operations Period (IOP 1) in September/2017, results from the different groups have been coming together to reveal a complicated plot around Pt. Sal, with lots of topographic wakes, recirculation south of the point, ridiculously sharp fronts and some really aggressive high-frequency internal waves.

Between about noon on the 12th until 9 am on the 13th, we tagged along the other vessels, repeating an L-shaped track in between the Sally Ride and the Sounder. The collective goal of our Inner Shelf Armada was to observe the flow around the cape and try to understand, among other things, how vorticity is produced by the separating tidal flow and how a background, subtidal along-shelf flow might influence this process.

R/V Sproul’s track with flow-through temperature.

All vessel tracks throughout the Pt. Sal survey (~12th-14th Sep/2017).

We crossed what looks like some high-frequency internal wave packets, visible in temperature, velocity and acoustic backscatter. A very sharp front (an internal bore?) with ~2 C change across just two neighboring uCTD profiles was encountered next, with a step-like signature also in the deep chlorophyll maximum and ADCP backscatter. There was a persistent, generally southward larger-scale flow for the entire survey, which lasted for almost a complete tidal cycle.

We had business in the Oceano Array and had to leave early on the second day of surveying, but hopefully by stitching the measurements above together with those from the other 5 vessels (see here, here, here and here) we will learn something about the phenomenology of sharp fronts, headland eddies and incoming high-frequency internal waves around Pt. Sal.

An Oceano trifecta in X-band vision

The IOP1 asset visualization now includes 3 ships, 3 boats, 2 sets of drifters and x-band radar images! Thanks to Falk Feddersen for hosting the full video of IOP1!

On 15 September the UNOLS vessel trifecta encountered mingling fronts and internal wave packets headed onshore during Oceano surveys. Two-hours of near-surface temperature data trail each vessel. The tightly-packed moorings, soon to be recovered, were in the middle of it all.  Good luck to the mooring recovery teams!

SIO student cruise wrap-up

After 240 hours of hard work and 4,970 towed uCTD casts, we are happy to add SCoNE (point Sal Coastal circulatioN Experiment) to the list of successful student cruises made possible by the UC Ship Funds Program.
We wish to thank everyone who worked to make this experiment a reality, including the Science Party and the Crew of the R/V Robert Gordon Sproul. André is very grateful for the awesome mentoring provided by Jen MacKinnon, Amy Waterhouse and Kate Adams, and for the hard work Spencer Kawamoto, Paul Chua, Jonny Ladner, Liz Brenner, Mary Huey, Eva Friedlander and many others put in preparing for and executing this amazing and unprecedented coordinated effort with the other groups involved in the Inner Shelf DRI.
More on the Sproul’s story and science coming soon!
André Palóczy and Kate Adams.
R/V R. G. Sproul‘s Crew
Chris Welton        (Captain)
Paul Dempster    (1st Mate)

Katherine Pogue (2nd Mate)

Wayne Lacy         (Cook)
Ernie Bayer          (Chief Engineer)

The SCoNE Science Party gathered on the bow of the R/V Sproul. From left to right: Kate Adams (on top photo) Spencer Kawamoto (on bottom photo), Julia Dohner, Praneeth Gurumurthy, Sahra Webb, Jess CG, André Palóczy, Jeff Coogan, Alice Ren, Manuel Gutiérrez-Villanueva, María Hernández. Center: Jeremiah Brower. Anacapa Passage is seen in the background, with Santa Cruz and Anacapa Islands on the right and left, respectively. Photo credits: Spencer Kawamoto (top) and Kate Adams (bottom).

scripps oceanography uc san diego