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  1. Voyager: How Long until Ocean Temperature Goes up a Few More Degrees?

    – Lily S., Austin, Texas Mar 18, 2014 The average temperature of the sea surface is about 20° C (68° F), but it ranges from more than 30° C (86° F) in warm tropical regions to less than 0°C at high latitudes. In most of the ocean, the water becomes colder ...

    Last Updated: March 19 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  2. Voyager: Why Don't Global Surface Temperature Trends Match Atmospheric CO2 Increases?

    – Ruben M., Watsonville, Calif. Feb 05, 2014 Great question Ruben! Global surface temperature is not expected to perfectly track CO2 because many other factors can also affect our climate. Still, it is quite an important factor, and the long-term warming ...

    Last Updated: February 5 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  3. Voyager: What would cause thermohaline circulation in the oceans to stop?

    – Richard B., Huber Heights, Ohio Dec 19, 2013   Thermohaline circulation, the large-scale movement of surface water through the world’s ocean basins, in latitudes near the poles is sensitive to temperature but even more so to salinity, so the larger conc ...

    Last Updated: January 16 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  4. Voyager Activity: Kids! Want to drive an underwater robot?

    New video games from Scripps put you in the driver’s seat Oct 01, 2013 What do you imagine scientists do each day? Maybe stand around in a lab coat and pour things into test tubes? Well, that is something scientists might do, but they also get to go on lo ...

    Last Updated: October 1 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  5. Voyager: When an earthquake happens, do plates under the earth really rub against each other or what is really happening?

    – Cortlynd B., 13, San Diego, Calif. Mar 20, 2013 – Submitted by Cortlynd B., 13, San Diego, Calif.  Many earthquakes indeed happen as a result of plates rubbing against each other. You can explore “in the laboratory” how earthquakes occur by rubbing two ...

    Last Updated: March 12 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  6. Voyager: Can marine life adapt to climate change and pollution in the ocean so it doesn’t hurt them anymore?

    Nov 04, 2010 Q. Can marine life adapt to climate change and pollution in the ocean so it doesn’t hurt them anymore? —Submitted by Madeline H., 13, Purcellville, Va. A.   Marine organisms live in a wide range of habitats and environments. These can range f ...

    Last Updated: February 8 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  7. Voyager: Does water from the California coast ever become water in the Atlantic Ocean?

    Jan 03, 2011 Q. Does water from the California coast ever become water in the Atlantic Ocean? —Submitted by Makenzie K.,16, Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif. A. The simple answer is yes when describing general, large-scale circulation of the oceans. However, ...

    Last Updated: February 8 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  8. Voyager: What makes the ocean salty and how much salt is in the ocean?

    Jan 03, 2011 Q. What makes the ocean salty and how much salt is in the ocean? —Submitted by Benjamin G., 6, Ruston, La. A. Some areas of the ocean are saltier than other but on average there are 35 grams of salt per kilogram of seawater. The ocean contain ...

    Last Updated: February 8 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  9. Voyager: Have whales always inhabited the Arctic? If not, where did they originally come from and how did they adapt?

    Mar 01, 2011 —Submitted by Teressa B., 17, Kotzebue, Alaska A. Whales have not always inhabited the Arctic. The earliest whales, which evolved between 50 and 55 million years ago, came from temperate or mild regions. Modern whales that we recognize today ...

    Last Updated: February 6 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  10. Voyager: Do Whales and Seals Have to Flee from Certain Arctic Environments once Sea Ice Conditions are Altered?

    Mar 01, 2011 Do whales and seals have to flee from certain Arctic  environments once the sea ice conditions are altered? If so, where would  they flee and why would it matter? —Submitted by Ryan F., 17, Manhattan Beach, Calif. A. To answer your question, ...

    Last Updated: February 6 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography